Tag Archives: Pakistan history

Pakistan Day … Really?

The celebrations of victory against Bangladesh in the final of Asia Cup are still in the air. The aerial firing went on for hours last night until I finally managed to sleep and found people to be more buoyant than usual today. The taste of hard-earned victory followed by a public holiday (Pakistan Day – 23rd March) makes it even more delicious. A big round of applause for the gallant Bengalis for their new-found energy and splendid display of performance never before seen on the field. Reaching the final after defeating the likes of Sri Lanka and India is an achievement unprecedented and a promise of much more to come in future.

The topic of this post is, however, not Cricket but the public holiday itself. Pakistan Day, celebrated on 23rd March based on Pakistan Resolution passed in 1940 by All-India Muslim League; that is part of every textbook written in the country for decades. We have all seen the great fanfare this day brings, watching PTV in the morning to see military march in Islamabad with several flotillas and stunts by airforce pilots. The books, on the other hand, never manage to actually explain what this resolution was. It is called Pakistan Resolution even though it was initially called Lahore Resolution and it was passed just after 11 pm on March 24 but is celebrated on 23rd March. What was written in the resolution, it is never taught. Continue reading

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Amar Jaleel on History

I came across this article by famous Sindhi author and columnist Amar Jaleel in Dawn magazine. It speaks truth about how the central leadership did not gave rights to Bengali brothers in pre-1971 Pakistan. It is though provoking article and we see much of its effects even now.

United Front Against Bengalis

Amar Jaleel

The wise learns lessons from past mistakes, the fool just repeats them

To understand the gravity of the problems between Eastern and the Western wings of Pakistan, we must take into account the huge difference in the population of East Pakistan and West Pakistan. At the time of the coming into being of Pakistan, the population of East Pakistan was 45 million and the population of West Pakistan was 30 million. This reality was always ignored by the successive rulers of Pakistan from 1947 to 1971.

The heat of the language controversy in 1948 was still smouldering in East Pakistan when Liaquat Ali Khan came up with his constitutional proposals. He proposed 200 seats each for East Pakistan and the West Pakistan in the Lower House, and 60 seats each for the two wings in the Upper House. Ignoring the uprising of the Bengalis on language issue in the recent past, Liaquat Ali Khan again recommended Urdu as the state language of Pakistan. Continue reading