Reason Before Passion

Sindhi, Pakistani and a Sufi Muslim

Never Force Left-Handed Child to be Right-Handed

Update: An edited form of this article was published in October 2011 edition of Circles Magazine.

I have used my right hand to perform major activities all my life. Even though my performance has remained average in most cases like quality of handwriting, sports and sketching, I considered it normal. Some time back at a family gathering my mother discussed with someone the complexities of bringing up children and I was surprised to learn that I was born left-handed.

She said she discovered I was left-handed due to the amount of pressure I exerted on her finger with each hand when two months old. At such a tender age she made sure my left hand remained immobile most of the time (though not uncomfortably) and was forced to use right hand freely that eventually became my dominant hand.

It was confusing for me at first but then a lot of unexplained habits began to fall into perspective such as attempting to pick something heavy from left-hand and then switching to right, preferring to chew food at the left side of mouth, skipping step while climbing stairs in order to land on the other foot etc. I often thought myself clumsy whenever something happened and didn’t thought it amiss until I discovered I was left-eye dominant a few years before the above mentioned family gathering.

I bought a guide for Snooker game and it gave details of an exercise to know your dominant eye. To increase shot accuracy, you need to place your Cue Stick beneath the dominant eye when playing shot and the book stated that born left-handed people, in most cases, have left-dominant eye. As you can expect, the exercise concluded that I was left-eye dominant. I didn’t focused more on the details and enjoyed the higher game accuracy that I now enjoyed.

After the revelation by my mother, I decided to do some research. As science explains, our brain is divided into two halves (hemispheres). Left hemisphere affects the right side of your body and right hemisphere affects the left side of the body. The left hemisphere deals with logic, words and language, mathematics, science, order/pattern perception, practical and reality. The right hemisphere deals with imagination, creativity, spatial perception, “big picture” orientation, symbols, images and feelings. If the left side of the brain is dominant, the person prefers right hand and vice versa. Our whole physical being is interconnected ever since we are born and forcing to go against natural dominance puts a lot of harmful pressure.

What more, about 85-92% of world’s population is estimated to be born right-handed which also causes some bias against left-handers as parents under societal pressure, ignorance or religious miscommunication forces their children to switch to right hand.

Forcing a left-handed to be right-handed causes reduced activity in the dominant right hemisphere and increase activity in the non-dominant side. Since creativity and imagination are dominant parts of right brain, they will remain under-developed and the left-side of the brain sees increased activity that deals with reality, facts and logic … characteristics that are opposite of the person’s true potential. The consistent use of non-dominant part of brain affects the personality while growing up and the adaptability can be difficult. Forced right-handers have to work a lot harder to improve handwriting, take more time to adjust in using tools like scissors and knives, are unable to perform better at activities (like sports) than natural right-handers, get tired easily and may even have language difficulties due to possible dominancy conflict between the two halves of the brain.

Comparing this with my own childhood I found some stark similarities. I had to use children’s handwriting improvement book until 8th grade to finally able to write clearly. I loved to draw and paint as a child but no matter how hard I tried I couldn’t improve and finally gave up by 7th grade. I was scolded repeatedly at home and in class for being a daydreamer and not paying attention. I always loved stories (and still do) and read fantasy novels most of my free time. I hate mathematics and enjoy history. I am able to think logically and analyze in a rather forced way and tire easily compared to when I am thinking something completely new and imagining a new story or concept to write down. The number of similarities is too long to fully list down.

There are select few who are ambidextrous (don’t have dominant hemisphere or so little dominant that it doesn’t affect much) and such individuals don’t have that much hard time in switching. Unfortunately I am not one of them and thus unable to achieve my full potential.

This doesn’t mean that left-handers are devoid of logic or right-handers lack creativity, it just points towards what comes as naturally and more easily to the person due to dominant side of brain. So if anyone you know is forcing a born left-handed toddler or child to be right-handed, please enlighten them and stop them for hindering the child’s growth. It is not advisable to force and yes, it is not un-Islamic as well to be left-handed as some believe.

For those who are interested in knowing if they are left-brain dominant or right-brain, watch this image below and see in which direction the woman moves (clock-wise or anti-clockwise).

If she is moving clock-wise, that means you are right-brain dominant and vice versa. If you focus a bit (or maybe a bit harder), the figure may turn her direction suddenly and begin rotating the other way.

The level of focus required to achieve that proves how much dominant on side of your brain is. In my case, the figure continuously moves clock-wise and no matter how much I try, I am unable to move it anti-clockwise. However I have seen others exclaiming how the figure all of a sudden change direction even though to me the movement is still in the same clock-wise direction.

Once again refer to this chart and see what characteristics each brain has and remember, never force born left-handed child to use right-hand permanently. You may teach them to use right but let them be left for their own good.

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August 8, 2011 - Posted by | Published Articles | , , , ,

227 Comments »

  1. Great work :) One question though, if the image changes direction, does this mean those people are ambidextrous? Because for me it changed direction form clockwise to anti-clockwise and then back to clockwise again…does that mean something or am I abnormal? =P

    Comment by Zofishan Shahid | August 8, 2011 | Reply

    • To be ambidextrous means you are able to use both the left-hand and right-hand with equal ease. If you are able to make the figure change direction, depending upon how much effort you required to do so (or maybe no effort at all) will explain how capable you are at “learning” or “using” the other half of your brain. Even though I am right-brain dominant but used right hand all my life, I have been only able to see the figure move clock-wise but others have had easier time making it change direction. Maybe I am the abnormal one here :P

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | August 8, 2011 | Reply

    • the reason why it “changes direction is because the image only does half a circle and then goes back to its original postion from the way it came.

      Comment by Dylan | June 5, 2012 | Reply

      • I am right handed. I see the figure moving clock wise, but also anti clock wise. But, you said the anti clock wise did not make a complete circle. The figure makes equal turns both ways. What about that. Explain please .

        Comment by Ella | January 29, 2014 | Reply

    • If I just think turn right, or turn left, the picture just does it.

      Comment by Anna | July 7, 2013 | Reply

    • Both your right and left brain seem to have reached a level of perfect harmony – rather than trying to dominant each other, they work together to create a unique and well-balanced “you”. Your spontaneous, impulsive, and free-flowing right brain creates an exciting and adventurous world, while you left brain helps you make sense of it and keep track of everything. I wish I can draw pictures with my left hand! I noticed my handwriting is not the same every time with the right hand.

      Comment by dylan | August 4, 2013 | Reply

    • The illusion of this figure is that it’s two dimensional, but to your eye it seems three dimensional. The reason it seems three dimensional is the shadow. The shadow does an anti-clockwise spin, on the other hand her body does a clockwise spin (this creates a conflicting illusion). The reason you can see her spinning is because of the speed with which she spins (she is actually flipping; half spin). If you are able to make her switch direction you’ll notice she shifts the leg she stands on (clockwise: left leg, anti-clockwise: right leg). If you are not immediately able to make her switch legs it’s because you are not paying attention to the shadow which in both scenarios move the opposite way of which it should be in the direction she is spinning.

      While this might give an indication as to which side of the brain you are using when looking at her, it is far from perfect. A person who has seen this gif many times (or a person well trained with spotting illusions) will be able to break the illusion and thereby switch her direction at will. Thus it is in fact a weak indicator of how your brain works. Still, it’s, to many, a mesmerising illusion and it’s hard for most people to break it.

      Comment by Nøkken | April 4, 2014 | Reply

  2. I was forced to change from left hand to right hand too.
    I still do some things with my left hand.
    I always wondered if I forced myself to change to left hand again what would happen.
    Anyways, I wish my mom read your article 25 years ago :)

    Comment by Nadim | September 26, 2011 | Reply

    • I wish my mom had done the same as well, then maybe my life would have been different as well :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | September 26, 2011 | Reply

      • when I was in pre-school my mum read an article about the similar topic. She tried to make me write with my left hand and when once I happen to write ‘3’ and ‘p’ the other way round my dad immediately put a stop. He said what is done is done. But as I was growing up there were periods where I would practice writing with my left hand but gave up cause it was difficult to control But now I find easier to write with my left hand so I’m practicing more often. Hopefully I will be able to write completely with my left hand by end of this year. Though I think I would still use my right hand for Japanese and signature. I dont want to completely neglect my right hand.

        Comment by Geetha | February 2, 2012 | Reply

        • That’s one of the hardest phases you can go through in childhood, being compared to others and reminded how awful you are. It also happened with me as I was compared to my neighbor and classmate (who I strongly believe is an ambidextrous) who always gained better grades in calculating subjects (Maths, Chemistry, Physics etc) and I was better with literature and theoretical understanding (English literature, Urdu literature, History, Islamic Studies). I was reminded how bad I was at science compared to him (and he was reminded how bad he was at languages and others compared to me), it was torturous for both of us. I at least never managed to make my parents understand that me and Ahmed are not the same people and have different approaches, attitude and environment and as a result had to start ignoring their glares and sarcastic comments. It worked to a certain level, enough to keep me going with my sanity intact. It’s is hard, but still manageable.
          I really hope you are able to use your left-hand properly for writing. I wish you luck and hope you do well.

          Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 6, 2012 | Reply

    • I wished my mom would of read this too.

      Comment by E. Lopez | October 14, 2012 | Reply

    • i was also forced to change from left hand to right hand too. But luckily on my part, i used the left for almost everything, like washing, cooking, and any hard work but one thing this change has done to me is that i have a very bad hand writing. i write with my right hand even though i could try writing with the left hand, the right hand is what i was forced to use. its so clumsy. when i watched the image, it moved both clockwise and anti clockwise. i have decided to start practicing with my left hand in writing. thanks for this article.

      Comment by Sweetass Moi | November 27, 2013 | Reply

    • i never changed my left hand,i love myself the way i am

      Comment by Mutuku Abraham Thuo | December 5, 2013 | Reply

  3. For me it was school that forced a change from left to right, with a ruler smack to the left hand if caught using it. I realized years ago that the change could have far reaching effects, This was the first time i’ve encountered information such as this. I plan to look deeper into the information found, at 45yrs of age i still have a lot of living left to do, maybe it will help. I REALLY wonder if this could have anything to do with tendencies toward mental or emotional problems or disorders???

    Comment by meghan | October 19, 2011 | Reply

    • You have raised a very valid point Meghan, so let us look at it a bit more in-depth. As I explained in the blog, using right hand will increase brain activity in your non-dominant part of brain. This makes it stronger over time and stagnate your naturally strong right-brain.

      Now, continuous use may end up dividing the brain into 50-50, effectively turning you into Ambidextrous. Ambidextrous people, although REALLY great at analyzing but completely hopeless at Conclusions.

      If you ask an Ambidextrous person “Please tell me what is happening?”, he/she will explain the whole scenario thoroughly and beautifully. But if you will ask “What do you think about this?”, you will not get a proper answer. Why? Because in giving a conclusion/personal opinion, you have set his both halfs of the brain at WAR. The left-brain insist on giving a logical, straight, fact oriented answer while the right one will attempt to give a more general, creative and occasion dependent answer. The person himself will be at a loss as to which one to give and end up not making sense.

      Strictly, this is not a disorder but kind of mental problem that should not be there in the first place for a born left-hander. Emotional problems, yes there are some because around you everyone finds doing some work easy but you completely fail at doing the same thing no matter how much you try. I have seen my father going through the same routine of office, home, rest, food (including the cuisine) and watching TV daily, unchanged even to the minute for over 20 years that I have noticed (he’s 60+ now whilst I’ll be turning 25). This is torturous in some ways because to others you are slow learner, day-dreamer, non-serious and more or less a disappointment (you can’t do a simple thing? Look how your brother does it easily. When everyone can do it, why can’t you?).

      It just wrecks your confidence, creates completely wrong picture about yourself and you start believing you indeed are a failure … in fact, a born failure. Einstein said a beautiful quote:

      “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | October 20, 2011 | Reply

      • Thank You for the prompt,informative response. I deal with a couple of “issues” caused by chemical imbalance. I had thought that although it is not an imbalance, a change forced like that could of led to mis-wiring. Glad to know that there is nothing to -my thoughts-, Oh yeah. right on the mark with the war and unable to answer thing.The situation at hand or person i am dealing with, plus all background knowledge i have that is relevant come together to produce the most likely to be accepted answer. No telling which side it will come from or if i can expand on it. I guess it could be called “”flashes of genius”” or examples of stupidity. All depends on how you look at it-from one side or the other or just a slow walk around the whole. Thank you again.

        Comment by meghan | October 20, 2011 | Reply

        • It is good to see fellow right-brainers discovering new information and attempting to improve and salvage what could be. I plan on practicing writing with left-hand soon. It will be a painful experience initially I am sure, but hopefully I might start writing legitimately by the end of 2012 if didn’t gave up half-way :)
          Wish there was a shorter route to get re-wired correctly but I guess personal effort and hard work can never be replaced by short-cuts. I hope things work out for you as well. Good luck :)

          Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | October 21, 2011 | Reply

      • I understand by what torturous mean. I’m born left hander changed to right as a baby. All my life I always get compared to my sister a right-hander. I kept telling my mum stop comparing us as no two people is the same even twins. Its always she can do it why cant I etc. It really hurts and I cant even create a decent sentance to make them stop. So in the end I just keep quiet.

        Comment by Geetha | February 2, 2012 | Reply

        • Hi Geetha,
          How did it work out? facing the same issue. is it possible to go back being left handed and no further complications?
          thanks.

          Comment by pabbi | April 7, 2013 | Reply

  4. My son was born a lefty. I’m a lefty. At the age of 4, his pre-k teacher (who was in her 70s) forced him to switch to writing with his right hand. When I finally realized what she’d done, I tried to get my son to switch back to his left hand, but the damage had already been done. He was convinced that he absolutely was not supposed to be a lefty. So now he’s 10 and all of the problems I’ve read from you and others, well I see these problems in my son. He’s written with his right hand for so long now and he says he doesn’t want to go back to being a lefty. But he doesn’t understand the full ramifications this has had on his life already. I’ve seen the negative impact this has had on him over the years and have always suspected that so much of what he was going through had to do with him being forced to switch. So as a parent I would ask you, would you have wanted your parent to have forced you to switch back and relearn how to write everything?

    Comment by Patty | October 29, 2011 | Reply

    • Patty
      That’s a very difficult question to answer. If I go back 15 years in time, I would find a 10 year old me utterly convinced that he is right-handed. If my parents would have realized the mistake and attempt to force me, not just I would refuse but would even call them crazy to even try it. For me, the left hand is weak so why should I switch? That means not only do I have to re-learn to write but also have to re-learn how to play different sports and completely switch many other activities.

      This is a very difficult age to control kids, but at this age I would say it was better that my parents should have forced me to at least LEARN to write and do some of the works from Left even if not forced me to make complete switch. Maybe some of the incentives might have also worked, such as:

      – If artistic, learning to make mirror images using both hands at the same time (there are some Youtube videos as well).
      – If sporty, learning to use both hands as forward and not relying at backhand at all (for Tennis and Table Tennis)

      For different nature, different incentive would work but I really would have thanked my parents if they had forced me to learn to use left hand at the age of 10 because I could have learned in 2 to 3 years how to use it properly and developed it on my own as years progressed.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | October 29, 2011 | Reply

      • I was also forced to use right hand when I was 4 and half or 5. My mother told me to do so only because a cousin was bullying me by hitting my left hand then report it to my mother that I hit him. My mother saw the whole thing but told me that I must change. It was bit abusive and my therapist encourages me to go back use my left hand. I tried but it is very hard due to the amount of effort needed. Even I want to change back, but it triggers certain sadness. I gave up again and again. I can relate to all the issues listed here and that is why I came across this site. My situation is different, and I am glad your son has you, a caring parent. I am still confused today emotionally, I am 43. I am determined to switch back though but it is much harder at 43 as I have work and obligations. 10 is a much easier age. I think if I were you, knowing my own experience, I would do more research on the topic, present the pros and cons to your son and let him make a decision for himself. I would not try to give him biased opinion but give him all facts. All the experiences from other adults. Take him to therapist (find a good one) if needed. I think what would made it much better for me growing up is that if back then, if one adult told me, I am here for you no matter what, I care about you and I want you to be happy. Whatever feels right for you (using right hand or left hand) is what you should choose, and I will support you, my child, always.

        Comment by S | December 6, 2012 | Reply

    • I was also forced to use right hand when I was 4 and half or 5. My mother told me to do so only because a cousin was bullying me by hitting my left hand then report it to my mother that I hit him. My mother saw the whole thing but told me that I must change. It was bit abusive and my therapist encourages me to go back use my left hand. I tried but it is very hard due to the amount of effort needed. Even I want to change back, but it triggers certain sadness. I gave up again and again. I can relate to all the issues listed here and that is why I came across this site. My situation is different, and I am glad your son has you, a caring parent. I am still confused today emotionally, I am 43. I am determined to switch back though but it is much harder at 43 as I have work and obligations. 10 is a much easier age. I think if I were you, knowing my own experience, I would do more research on the topic, present the pros and cons to your son and let him make a decision for himself. I would not try to give him biased opinion but give him all facts. All the experiences from other adults. Take him to therapist (find a good one) if needed. I think what would made it much better for me growing up is that if back then, if one adult told me, I am here for you no matter what, I care about you and I want you to be happy. Whatever feels right for you (using right hand or left hand) is what you should choose, and I will support you, my child, always.

      Comment by S | December 6, 2012 | Reply

  5. [...] Never Force Left-Handed Child to be Right-Handed [...]

    Pingback by Never Force Left-Handed Child to be Right-Handed | Tea Break | November 2, 2011 | Reply

  6. i’m still not sure which side of my brain is dominant…i believe i was born right-handed, but as a kid i used to get confused about which hand to eat with…i would alternate between left and right..same with the side i chew food…i also used to try writing and drawing with my left hand sometimes…i still do that…and i’m currently a fashion design student who also loves maths & accountancy :)

    Comment by anju | November 20, 2011 | Reply

    • If you are able to alternate between the two hands and manage to love completely opposite subjects (Fashion Designing and Maths/Accounts) then you most probably are ambidextrous :)
      Being ambidextrous gives you a lot of benefits but just one drawback and that is confusion. As you yourself said, you got confused as a child which hand to use for eating. The same way you may also get confused when making decisions, especially those that depend solely on YOUR choice. At one moment your plan would sound perfect to you and the next moment you may start doubting it. That’s a war between the two halves of the brain which nearly all ambidextrous people go through but this is how you were born and nothing is wrong. Use it as your strength because compared to a left-dominant or right-dominant person, you will have much greater analytic and comprehensive understanding of ANY given situation :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | November 20, 2011 | Reply

  7. Really interesting :-) I stumbled on this searching for answers. My eight year old son has a great deal of difficulty with fine motor skills, writing being the greatest one. He didn’t start talking untill 4 and even now he’s still playing ‘catch up’. His speech therapist explained it in simple terms to me that our brains can file everything away neatly in ‘filing cabinets’ which we can access when necessary whereas his swims round in his head and he has to fish around for words and responses which in turn takes longer to respond if he does at all. He is getting alot better. He never had a lead hand by the time he’d joined school because up until then i’d been advised to let him work that one out which he never really did, the pencil would go into either hand, then when he joined school we started putting in his right hand which I think now was a bad idea. He does everything else left handed, drink, eat, kick a football, pick things up. I’d never really questioned it before until recently because his handwriting etc isn’t improving and what you’ve said about which part of the brain is most dominant it makes sense I think.

    Comment by Mel | November 22, 2011 | Reply

    • Hi Mel. From what I know, strong left-brain dominant people have speech difficulties for longer period of time. I myself started to speak late, probably by third year and even then the coherency wasn’t there until many years down the lane. So I find that similarity in the situation you explained about you son. I would suggest to teach him to use left-hand for writing. It’s no use switching over forcefully, he may resist and not able to learn it at all but at least try to make him dual-handed when it comes to writing. Once he is grown up, 10 to 15 years down the line, he will settle down himself.
      The speech therapist explained it well and I am sure it must have helped your son in catching up. Once he settles down there will be marked improvement in his overall performance. I would advice you to encourage him towards debates and public speaking during his teenage years, it will speed up his “catching up” and once he does catch up, he will probably excel than others.
      I wish you and your son good luck :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | November 22, 2011 | Reply

  8. If u want the figure to change direction, focus on the shadow of her legs turning. I could not feel it for 10 mins before i did this, but now i can make myself feel tht it has changed direction with ease. Try it folks…….

    Comment by Siddharth Swaroop M | December 2, 2011 | Reply

  9. i am forced to be right handed too hen i was younger and ever since i cannot make my writing skills better, i have a very poor accuracy in terms of aim like darts or basketball and i am also poor in sports, i have great imagination though but poor patience and focus. do you thin if i tried to be left handed again will my focus and accuracy be regain?

    Comment by rheyniel | December 4, 2011 | Reply

    • Hi ryheyniel
      If you start learning to play with your left-hand, it will take you some time but will eventually learn to use it. It will require a lot of patience and focus though, something which you say you are struggling with. Maybe you can take it up as a challenge, to prove yourself that you CAN do it and be better. It will test your resolve and if you really want to be a better person, I say go for it and teach yourself to be left-handed.

      In the meantime I might be able to help regarding darts and basketball. When taking aim with your right hand, it is a natural tendency that you will use your right eye. Your dart hand/basketball shot will be aimed using right eye’s line of sight that will be a few degree to the left or to the right of the actual target. Either you can learn through trial and error as to how much difference there is and compensate accordingly.

      Another way would be to take target using your left eye. It will be awkward, positioning you hand below your left eye with your right hand but once you get the hang of it, your accuracy will improve.

      But before all of that, I would suggest you find out yourself which eye is dominant. You can use this snooker test to discover. Always use your dominant eye for aiming.
      http://www.billiardsforum.info/pool-playing-tips/finding-your-dominant-eye.asp

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | December 4, 2011 | Reply

      • I tried this dominant eye test, now I have pain behind my right eye.

        Comment by Nik | August 13, 2013 | Reply

  10. Hi I was also one of those people that was forced to write with my right hand. I did not find this out until I was a teenager, I am 43 years old now, and have a son that is left handed. I however can write with both my left and right hand equally well. I took a personality test for my job that looks very closely at the thought pattern and I had one of the highest scores ever. I was in sports in school and excelled at them, but ask me to make a quick decision on the menu at the drive through and it takes a while to choose. I can now see and understand why things are the way they are with my thought process and personality. I would like to start using my left hand again and see what comes of it, much to my mothers chagrin:) P.S. I can make the lady turn both ways, just by changing the way I perceive seeing her.

    Comment by Kathy Berger | December 13, 2011 | Reply

  11. Hi i am right handed but do alot of things with my left hand.I found it very hard to learn at school get muddled with left and right and my scene of direction is bad.

    Comment by kim | December 20, 2011 | Reply

  12. I’m not sure I agree with this article. Everyone is different, and natural left handers who were forced on to the right path might just be imagining all of these negative side “effects” or they might be using it as an excuse for certain behaviours that could be changed with a little dogged effort.

    I am 23 years old now. As I began scribbling as a very small child, I always picked up my crayons and other media with my left hand. My mother would then also give me the infamous ruler smack and would place the media in my right hand. This process continued until I was comfortable using my right hand for everything. I drew constantly. When a parent took me outside to play ball, I’d get bored and run back into the house after a few minutes to draw. As I grew up I never had a problem improving my artistic and drawing skills. I won many provincial and national art competiions while at school. I can make complete photorealistic sketches of people in bars and nightclubs, I can create abstract artwork as well and I can come up with very creative concepts in general. I can draw immensely well, better than any left handed or right handed person in my age group, at least in my country, where art isn’t really a big industry. My skills might pale in comparison to what you might see outside of Africa, but they are still pretty good. I also write stories in my spare time and I’m thinking about studying film next year. I already have a degree in architecture. My switching over to the right hand definitely had no negative side effects. At least, I don’t think so. Perhaps if I had stayed a lefty I would have been 10 times better at what I’m doing now? I don’t think so. Our writing convention issimply better suited for the right hand. Seeing a left handed person writing always cracks me up. It just looks wrong and uncomfortable, the arm always needing to be raised so the ink won’t smudge.

    Besides, I don’t think that it’s an absolute truth that right brained people aren’t good at or not interested in mathematics, science, accounting, etc. I loved science and maths at school, and miss those subjects to this day. I hated accounting, though. Rather do not convince your children that just because they are right brained that it’s excusable for them to suck at maths and science. In my opinion those two subjects should be compulsory. I did extremely well in both, with marks in the 90s and sometimes I’d even score full marks on my tests, all higher grade, I might add. I don’t believe that I have an innate talent for mathematics, but a little dogged effort can get you very far.

    I do believe that, and here is where my parents definitely went wrong, a child who is clearly right brained should always be encouraged to improve on his creative talents. Convince him that if it is indeed what he loves, he should persue it. Getting me to study architecture was an attempt by my parents to play it safe – they considered it, and they did so correctly, a compromise between left and right. My parents are some of those people who believe you are a fool if you intend to persue a full-blown artistic career. What might have done damage to me is that I’ve never devoted as much time on my artistic talents as I should have, due to negativity from my parents and other family towards the finacial prospects of an artistic career. I intent to change this. Don’t force your child into putting too much more time and devotion into the left brained subjects at school. Let art or music or drama or whatever it may be, be his main priority but don’t allow him to slack off in the left brained side of the spectrum – those fields are also so very important in our lives. Afterall, it’s cool to have a lot of knowledge about a vareiety of different things.

    However, I personally can not vouch for the truth in the statement that forcing a natural left hander will ruin his creative life forever. I might very well force my own children over ro use their right hands one day.

    Regarding that silhouette…I always see it truning lockwise initially, but I can force it to spin the other way by looking at the anchored foot, and then switching the direction in which the toes are facing at any given moment.

    This link goes to an online portfolio of some of my drawings, if anyone needs veryfication that I spoke the truth when I said that I can draw very well: http://www.wix.com/zakemp/zakwix

    Comment by zak | January 2, 2012 | Reply

    • Hello Zak, thank you for your thoughts on this article. It is really good to know that despite the change of hand it did not affect you and you continue to enjoy doing what you like to do. Let me assure you, I never said in this article that it is an “Absolute” truth and cannot be different at all. As I said in one paragraph:

      This doesn’t mean that left-handers are devoid of logic or right-handers lack creativity, it just points towards what comes as naturally and more easily to the person due to dominant side of brain.

      That is what my article explained, what comes naturally to you due to your dominant side of brain and maximizing it. It does not mean that if you were left-handed, you would be ten times better. It means that it may have been easier for you to do the same but if you have managed to cross that barrier that prevents you from achieving the level you would have then it is all for the best.

      Also, the Latin script the forces you to write from left to write is uncomfortable for the left-handers. That is why they have to keep their hands raised or adjust so that they don’t smudge ink. But Arabic script and its language driven from it, like the ones here in Pakistan (Urdu, Sindhi, Punjabi etc), are from right to left and they are uncomfortable for the right-handers. Now the right-handers have to raise their arms awkwardly to avoid smudging ink and all.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 2, 2012 | Reply

  13. Hi.
    I was surfing the net on both handed and notice your informative article. I was surprised that someone has the exact same thought as mine.
    I was born as a right handed (but my parent told me I use both handed first before I changed to right handed), then I continue using it for 19 years,

    While each person has their own reasons of using the opposite hand, mine is just simply want to use the brain potential as much as possible.

    I started practicing left hand use for 4 years now (23 y old now), which I manage to get most daily activity to be learn with left hand (including walking with left feet first) and I still practicing in writing, and it is extremely difficult.

    I began to think when I started learning left hand that it wouldn’t make much sense if someone is force to use right hand via leaving the dominant side of the brain less developed and they will “convert” to right handed, they are still using a side that is less dominant, so they should have trouble learning whether they realise or not.

    To cut the long story short, I consider what might happen same as you. I have some friends clearly demonstrated that theory is true, although I also have friends who are also have well developed right brain, which they are very good in East Asian calligraphy and Chinese water colour art and they are using right hand to do.

    But I think that if they also use the left hand again after so much right hand use, they can become very good ambidextrous as they already developed the less dominant side, so they just need to work the dominant side again (which should be a lot easier compare with a right handed trying to write with left hand like me, although still need hard work).

    I am glad someone like you wrote this out, so it can bring the message out.
    PS: For your information, the dancing lady change frequently for me, like 5-8 sec only, probably a by product of using both hand again, although I never understand how does it work.

    Comment by Vincent | January 7, 2012 | Reply

    • If your friends are good calligraphers despite using the wrong hand than I must say they have real talent for it. There is no alternative to it and if they are good doing it with right hand, they should continue with. They may become very good ambidextrous if they try but it is better not to let their brains go to war at each other when it is time to make crucial decisions.

      I had plans to start writing with left-hand this year and will probably start by the end of this month. I am quite sure it’s going to be very difficult, as you yourself indicated, but I am hoping to get positive results out of it :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 22, 2012 | Reply

  14. What happens when a possibly right-handed child early on is reinforced to write and draw with her left hand due to that appearant tendancy. My eight year old has been writing and drawing with her left hand because of what we(parents) and teachers assumed was her natural tendency early on. When she began to play sports I have noticed a preference for right handedness. Baseball batting right, throwing baseballs and footballs with right hand, throwing a frisbee with her right hand, and KICKING with right foot. Currently in 3rd grade she is struggling with her handwriting, has difficulty with reading comprehension, and gets frustrated and emotionally upset with some test taking. Behaviorally she is always praised for being the nice kid or the kid likely to share. Also math is her best subject and she loved playing with build it type toys…lego..tinker toys. I just had a meeting with teachers about her learning problems and they were interested in my theory of maybe she is truely right handed. We are going forward with some basic learning disability tests. They suggested a few tests to check her handedness but I’m not sure of their professional expertice. Any thoughts on the problems with the reverse hypothetical

    Comment by Andy K | January 21, 2012 | Reply

    • I think this is the same case in a reverse way. I was a complete convert to right-hand since childhood since i was developed that way from cradle, so maybe that is one reason I didn’t developed strong preference for left-hand but from the sound of it, your child maybe pure right-handed. It is similar to my childhood friend Mohammed Ahmed. He preferred writing with left-hand, no matter what his mother did (she even tied his left hand a couple of times to force him to use the right hand but he couldn’t, so she let him be) but used right for everything else. He played Cricket with right-hand both Batting and Bowling (similar to Base and Pitching in Baseball), played Soccer with right foot preference and everything else right handed. He liked maths a lot compared to languages, however I am sure he is Ambidextrous because he always struggled in taking long-term decisions.

      If your child is not Ambidextrous, I suggest going through the tests and see if they provide with some conclusive results. At this point it is just a theory but if it really works and she indeed turns out to be right-handed and reverts to the other hand, so much the better.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 22, 2012 | Reply

  15. I can greatly identify with most of the experiences that you guys have shared.
    However, I have a problem and I question.
    My parents recently told me I was born left handed and that, I did almost everything with my left hand until my mother forced me to use my right hand. (This included eating) and I can recall I had a problem with wearing shoes and slippers. I always put the right shoe/slipper on my left foot and vice versa.
    As at the moment of this writing, I am strongly right hand dominant and I have had many various emotional and psychological imbalances and I don’t know what is causing it.
    It took me a long time to learn how to speak well and at the moment I stutter when speaking. I can identify with the fact that I look clumsy most of the time and I cant even figure whats happening to me.
    I don’t really like math and I don’t see myself creative a person.
    I am a slow reader and during exams, I don’t finish my papers on time.
    I hate to admit this but for a year and half now, I have been exhibiting symptoms of paranoia and I think this is as a result of my deep involvement with religion; Fear of being alone, fear of being in the dark amongst many other weird fears.
    I just want to know if I was really born left-handed and if the switch to the right hand has anything to do with it my current state.

    Would learning how to use my left hand help?
    Should I try to regain the power of my left hand again.

    PS: At the moment, I dont really know what I am good at. I dont seem to be creative or care about fashion and music and I dont seem to love math no matter how hard I try…. I just get emotional.

    Comment by ZyGS | January 28, 2012 | Reply

    • ZyGS, the situation you have explained sounds quite serious. Some of the symptoms you have shared, I can relate to them as I faced them as well like learning to speak late, emotional imbalance and sometimes stuttering especially when I am tired.
      I learned to control my emotional side initially by reigning it tightly with logic. As a result I became quite emotionless, more robotic in behavior. This allowed me a lot more room to observe my surroundings and learn through social interactions. It took the better part of my teenage years to use this method to gain emotional stability and another few years to attain maturity.
      I won’t say it is a good method but I had no one to guide and this is how I learned through trial and error, finally becoming what I am today through sheer willpower. Until you find a better solution, I suggest that you start depending upon your instincts more and strengthen your willpower.
      As for creativity, don’t confuse it with traditional arts like music, painting, sculpturing etc. Creativity can be expressed in any form. I cannot play any musical instrument, I was never good at drawing or painting and by voice is good enough to crack glass if I tried to sing. This puts to rest any ‘traditional’ creativity the right brained people might have, but the word creativity used is not really traditional.
      Creativity means you defy orthodox methods and find new ways to do the same thing. This could be in sports, social interactions, computer programming languages, business strategies and what not. Anything you are good at doing, as a right-brain dominant person you have the innate ability to do it more creatively. You can do so in any part of your life, including exams. I remember a friend, left-handed, who used to keep watch that was 20 minutes ahead of the correct time and used that to time his exam paper. He would always manage to finish exams at least 15 minutes ahead of the original time using that method. No one, including me, had ever tried doing that more than 10 minutes of time difference.
      Religion itself does not cause fear, so don’t worry about it being the main factor of fear within you. However if there are natural fears, the religion may increase them if you focus too much on the punishments side for the sins a person commits. Balance that by focusing on the rewards for doing good deeds and try to incorporate those positive habits in you. Try to smile more naturally, greet people with respect, treat those younger than you with kindness and help those in need. These are just minor abilities but they have major impact on your personality. The greatest effect will be to accept the inevitability of death. It will come when it’s time, so no use worrying about it. What are you going to do about it matters little because you cannot make any strategy to counter death and neither can you plan any successful campaign to attain paradise. What I learned from life is to accept its reality, understand that it will end when it is supposed to and whatever I have done in this life I will be answerable in the hereafter. Therefor I have stopped fearing darkness, lonliness, failure etc only by accepting the inevitability of death. Just realize the fact that it will come one day and that’s that, be it in the heat of battle or as an old person in bed. No use worrying about it and better start living because life has colors, people, places, architecture, breaths, water, air, soil, plants, animals, birds and gazillion other things you have missed noticing worrying about different fears.
      Just pick up the nearest object, even if it is a pen, and pay close attention to it. Focus on its color, its design, texture, mechanism, words etched on it and the fact how it fits in your hand. When you write, notice how blank page slowly gets filled as the ink flows to color the page. Notice how the words form into sentences, sentences into paragraphs and paragraphs into chapters. There is so much to know and feel that would boggle mind beyond belief.
      I do not know if shifting to left-hand will help you recover but taking necessary actions to counter fears in you are more important than changing hands. Try to work on them first before anything else and trust both your instincts and willpower to get you through any bad phase of your life.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 29, 2012 | Reply

  16. Thank you for making time enough to share your experiences coupled with words of advise. And I’m following the advise all the way. At least I am glad there is someone out there who has shared my experience and understands what I have been going through and now I don’t feel so left alone. Thanks once again bro.

    PS: I think the woman’s images moves in both directions if I set my gaze on it for close to about 5 – 10 minutes. You can try looking at it again and who knows, it may move this time around. All the same, I’d really love to get to know more about you.

    Comment by ZyGS | January 29, 2012 | Reply

    • I have tried many times, even before writing this blog, and only rarely did it turned the other way for me. Then again I don’t see much point in forcing the image to rotate the other way since I am clearly right-brain dominant. As for my life, most of it is open book and available over the internet. You can read about and find some relevant links here

      http://about.me/wasioabbasi

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 31, 2012 | Reply

  17. After reading this I feel sad. My mother told me I was left handed because I would ask her why I never gotten a confirmation on my pre-school book saying I was right handed or left handed. The space was left blank. Being curious, I asked my mom and she told me that I would write with my left hand and sometimes switch back to right hand. She told me I preferred my left hand and so she wanted me to change because she thought it would be hard for me to grow up being left handed as most tools are for right handed people (true I agree…). I don’t blame her because she just wanted what she thought was good for me. But now that it’s cleared up, I now understand why I used to experiment writing with my left hand when I was bored, the writing would come out wriggling like a toddlers handwriting, but now I can write very slowly with my left hand (the writing is clear but not as good as my right hand). But yes, I’m terrible at sports, I’m only good at sports that do not require using a dominant hand to play. My friends find it surprising why the only sport I do is running. :D
    On the creative side… I was never good at piano, but I did enjoy drawing (with my right hand though) even though I was not extremely brilliant. I love singing alot. I hate Maths. I’m very emotional.. maybe that has to do with being left handed (or my horoscope sign Scorpio I don’t believe in it)?

    I wish I was purely left handed, I wonder if it would’ve affected the subjects I have chosen this year. I consider myself a Semi-ambidextrous. I’m still going to try and write more with my left hand if I have the time too!

    Comment by Kim | January 30, 2012 | Reply

    • Hi. I’m not the writer =] but I share similar experience with you. I was told I am a right handed but in fact I only know that 1 month ago that I used both hand to do things before I went to school. And according to Asia country like Hong Kong I come from, right hand is consider to be normal and so I was dragged into believing that I was born right handed.

      Although I start to practice left hand 4 years ago with reason listed in my post, and only realise that I was probably a natural born ambidextrous a month ago. It is fair to say that not many people in this world know about ambidextrous, neither do your school book have the option “ambidextrous” which I doubt they will have.
      A lot people define true ambidextrous as equal handedness on all tasks which I heavily disagree on as a natural born ambidextrous can re learn their other hand on any motor skills (I also mean anyone can learn other hand regardless of whether they are born ambidextrous of not), and it is perfectly normal that your “dominant” hand will always be better since there is always a huge gap of motor skill experience between your hands.

      I tend to consider whether you like something is depended on your existing knowledge about it, so you kind of have to force yourself to known something that you hate but then later you adapted the knowledge and you will start liking it.
      I also hate to play music, but I got a piece of music (probably a 5th or 6th music piece) I really like sometime ago, and I want to prove I can learn piano without passing any grade as well as practice my left hand so I start playing piano, it was very very frustrating , but then when I manage to play to first few lines of note, I start become motivated. (and I still learning, although very slowly =.=)
      I am planning to take up art sometime later, which I also hate but want to be good at it.

      You should be proud because you are probably a natural ambidextrous as well.

      Vincent
      PS I am also Scorpio and I don’t believe in it =]

      Comment by Vincent | January 30, 2012 | Reply

      • o.o OMG haha I’m from Hong Kong too! Wow. And yes, people from Asia believe left handers are freaks…. my best friend is left handed and she told me her grandma wanted her to switch because it was “bad luck” but her mom did not allow that to happen.

        Comment by Kim | January 31, 2012 | Reply

      • Not just Honk Kong, even my country Pakistan also has the same mindset. Right-handedness is considered normal and lefties are thought to be abnormal (to say the least). Mostly it is due to religious teachings and miss-communication that results in so much trouble for left-handers.
        I do agree that any hand can be learned. It all depends upon how much you exert pressure on your brain and force the hemisphere to work. The experience itself can have great effect because your dominant hand will always have more developed motor skills than the other one. Then again, it is always better to have a dominant hand which is your naturally dominant rather than forced.
        In my time in school I did enjoyed Biology and Maths while preparing for exams. Those were the only time when I truly understood what I am studying and felt fascinated, but the marks put to end any fascination that I developed so I stayed away from them for good :)
        And yes, I am Scorpio and I do believe its characteristics (though not future predictions like how this week will fare or how your year will turn out to be).

        Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 31, 2012 | Reply

    • Surprisingly the first sport I became good at was also running :D
      After playing Cricket for so many years as a child, I gave a shot for Athletics and despite lacking the physical toughness I still managed to do well and went on to captain my school team for 4 years. I think the lack of hand preference did play its part and it was a great experience while it lasted. It is really good to know that you are able to use both hands. Probably from tomorrow I will start practicing with my left-hand to see if I can train myself to write with the hand that should have been dominant. It is going to be a very frustrating experience but it is worth the shot :)
      Being emotional is part of Scorpio and I know that since I am Scorpio myself (October 26). When you mix it with the right-brain characteristics then it can have interesting effects as I have experienced in my life and sometimes it can get terribly confusing how people react to your words and emotions.
      Even if you were purely left-handed, I think it would not have mattered much with regards to subjects. I struggled a lot with maths but it was good that I survived and glad for that experience. Same is the case with Biology. I gained C grade in that subject but the knowledge proved useful :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 31, 2012 | Reply

      • Whoa….. sh-t. o.o My b-day is also October 26! THIS IS CRAZY!! What a small, small world. :P

        Comment by Kim | January 31, 2012 | Reply

        • Really? Lol, it sure is a small world. This makes us Distant Twins :D

          Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 1, 2012 | Reply

  18. That rotating woman is so fascinating! I am right handed, but very obviously right-brain dominant in terms of my personality. My toddler son is left-handed, so I found this site when doing a little research on how to help him navigate a right-handed world. The lady clearly turns clockwise for me. I had a hard time getting her to change direction until I turned my body to look at her mainly with the right eye. After a few moments, she changed direction! I wonder why I am so clearly right brain dominant, though I am very much a right-handed person?

    Comment by Lakshmi | January 31, 2012 | Reply

    • Are you completely sure you are born right-handed? I would suggest using any test to find out your dominant eye, such as the snooker test or any other. That will explain if you really are born right-handed or left-handed. You may even be ambidextrous without realizing it.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 31, 2012 | Reply

  19. This is a very interesting article. I am lefthanded and clearly right brain dominant. although I am ok with some of the things noted on the left brain but not great with them. My mum is left handed so never was forced to use my right hand, not even at school. I love to sing, have very good rhythm and have a very good “ear” for music and play the trumpet. I am also very “big picture” focus and am always using this term in my discussions as a manager. Love good fantasy whether it is a novel or a movie. Decision making is very easy for me as I tend to go a lot with gut instinct. Do not function very well when I am boxed in and not allowed to explore options.

    Comment by Theresa Ward | February 1, 2012 | Reply

    • You’re quite lucky in that you were never forced to switch hand. I am sure as a manager it must have been quite helpful for you. Big Picture orientation always helps in understanding the overall situation, but for right-handers it is always important to give them milestones to achieve. They understand the situation better when it is more systematic and quantifiable. I really wish you well and loads of luck for future :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 6, 2012 | Reply

  20. I’m 17 and im left handed, ive decided i want to try and write with my right hand so its more comfortable writing in binders because all left handed people know its almost impossible to write in a binder and this can be frustrating since im going to college in september, i excel in math and love history but my englsih isnt the strongest, ive learned how to write with my right hand enough to beable to read it with in about an hour and a half, but when i tried doing some math it seemd like it was harder to figure out the equations could this be related and could this make some of my mental skills lower like math, but the weird thing is i naturally play all my sports like throw a ball with my right and would this mean im ambidextrous and if i was would that mean it wouldt matter im really confused

    Comment by Kalvin | February 6, 2012 | Reply

    • If you are left-handed for writing but play nearly all sports right-handed (and you are quite competitive in all these sports) then there is a strong possibility that you are ambidextrous. It does not mean in absolute terms. You might be weak ambidextrous, meaning one half of your brain is stronger than the other, giving more strength to one of your hands. Strong ambidextrous mean both halves are equally strong, which makes switching hand quite natural.
      Trying to switch hands will affect the way you utilize your brain since a different part of it is affected. Right hand is linked with left side of the brain and left hand with the right side of the brain, the strain of switching hands will affect the way you think and long term affects include a difference in thought process, personality, mindset, interests and habits and planning.
      No skills will be ‘lowered’ by switching hands. Instead they can be ‘thresholded’ but that is also debateable. I know two girls from my school days who were left handed and both went to become doctors. They excelled in Maths in class as well but without any doubt they were hardworking and would spends weeks preparing for the exams. So, whatever hand you use, you can always overcome the deficiency through sheer hard work and effort. If you really are ambidextrous, even a weak one, then you will have it much easier to do study the same thing with lesser effort compared to others.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 6, 2012 | Reply

  21. You said that the right brain controls the left side of the boy and the left brain contols the right side of the body. I am right-brained, but i am also right-handed, have a dominat right foot and a dominant right eye. How do you explain this?

    Comment by Kellan | February 20, 2012 | Reply

    • Hi Kellan. This is certainly an odd situation. I have not heard anyone with right dominant eye who also has a right dominant brain. Ambidextrous have both dominant eyes therefor that is out of the equation.
      What I would suggest is to try a few more exercises to make sure you really are right-eye dominant. If the results are still the same as you stated, I believe a better answer can be obtained from an expert on Neuro-sciences. They deal with brain all the time and know a lot more then me.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 22, 2012 | Reply

  22. thanks for this wonderful info about my biggest problem on earth.I went through a bitter experience back in my kindergarten where i was subject to several beatings cos i was left handed.After looking at the woman(rotating) i realized that my right side is dominant.now i know the cause of some very embarrassing moments in my life.In lectures,church,public gatherings and even when with my peers ,i am always tensed up AND CAN’T THINK LOGICALLY.I AM DYING OF THIS.SOMEONE HELP ME COS I FEEL HOPELESS.
    joy korda(male)
    26yrs
    Ghana.

    Comment by JOY NUKU KORDA | February 22, 2012 | Reply

    • Dear Joy, many face difficult time just like you did when forcefully converted from left to right hand. The purpose of this article is to highlight this fact and make one realize the potential one has, the abilities and possibilities that can now be harnessed once you get to the bottom of the problem. You think differently, that is why you will behave differently as well and not the same way as most right handers do. So if you feel left out from the gang, don’t worry about it. You only need to identify your strong areas and work on them. I am sure you can do wonders you get the hang of things your way :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 24, 2012 | Reply

  23. is there nothing i can do to get this off my neck?

    Comment by joy korda | February 24, 2012 | Reply

    • Don’t worry, brother. Both right- and left-handed have strengths and limitations. Some may limitations not be inherently linked to the ability to use your right or your left hand. Some people use their left hand to write but when it comes to kicking a soccer ball, it all shifts to the other side. Don’t feel hopeless just because you were coerced to change from left to right. Even in your present condition, you can still achieve the best of your potentials. Yes, I know you can.

      Comment by Joe | September 20, 2012 | Reply

      • Don’t worry, brother. Both right- and left-handed have strengths and limitations. Some limitations may not be inherently linked to the ability to use your right or your left hand. Some people use their left hand to write but when it comes to kicking a soccer ball, it all shifts to the other side. Don’t feel hopeless just because you were coerced to change from left to right. Even in your present condition, you can still achieve the best of your potentials. Yes, I know you can.

        Comment by Joe | September 20, 2012 | Reply

  24. I was also born left handed but forced to be right handed. I see the rotating girl image is moving anti-clock wise and after putting a lot of concentration I can able to make it move clock wise. My handwriting is pathetic. I like maths but slow in calculation and thats why most of the time I won’t able to complete my exam, though I know everything. I’m also very good in chess but take lots of time to think about my move. In cricket, I’m a left handed batsman but right handed bowler(I’m not good in cricket).All other things I do with my right hand. If someone ask me to rotate, I’ll prefer rotating clockwise.

    Is my mind fully developed? what should I do in this situation?
    Now I’m 19 years old.

    Comment by suraj | February 27, 2012 | Reply

  25. I was born left handed but was forced to write with right hand. For the longest time i only saw the girl moving clockwise but after concentrating hard i saw the girl moving anti clockwise as well (i.e after forcing many collegues to see and fight with them stating that the girl isint moving anti-clock wise hehehehe). i am and have always been more creative and have all the traits of a left handed person as described in this article which is wonderful. However, i belief that being forced to write with your right when you were left handed at birth does not spoil your life or put you to at any great disadvantage (although i completely agree that such natural developements must not be forced onto a child). It may affect a person to an extent, however i dont think it affects one so much that it imposes any major disadvantage. President Obama is a left handed person and i am certain he uses “logic” too to run his country and not merely his feelings. So all you people out there (inlcuding me) who were born left handed but were forced to write with the right hand do not get disheartned, i am sure such things do not affect one immensely however yes there might be some possible changes like the article rights states. And yes, all things that i end up doing unconsiously like eating and other things i mostly do with my left. Also, i have realised that i can write with my left hand better than a person who is a right handed person so yes, we can become ambidextrous!!! cheers people!!

    Comment by Priya | March 5, 2012 | Reply

    • Priya, It is exactly true for me what you said, all of the above. I was corrected when I was four and half and now I am 43. I have done very well in school always, I am good at math, logical thinking and very detail oriented. but I dislike math so much now at this age I finally felt I can not do it anymore. My hand wring has been not good no matter how I practiced, sports not good and I feel I have done things I do well but not enjoy doing my whole life. I am still very creative but I feel I have so much to express that I simply do not know how to let it out. At least, now I am aware and I am trying to be myself and be happy. Did the change from left to right alone may have compromised my creative potential? I can not say for sure. I think an adult should never try to change a child the way she or he is. and I like your positive attitude. cheers!

      Comment by S | December 6, 2012 | Reply

  26. My father forced me to change hands. I grew up being very clumsy. I don’t remeber any of it. My mom said he kept smacking my left hand.

    Comment by Mary Anne Pecorella | March 6, 2012 | Reply

  27. I’m one of those that was forcibly converted from left to right. i came across this web site that seems to have a scientific and statistical approach:
    http://www.linkshaender-beratung.de/english/Problem.htm

    From this site, I have taken the following excerpt:

    The possible primary consequences of converting handedness are as follows:

    memory disorders (especially in the recall of learned material)
    disturbances in concentration (being easily tired)
    legasthenic problems or dyslexia (i.e. problems in reading and writing)
    spatial disorientation (uncertainty concerning the left and right)
    disorders in fine motor skills that manifest themselves in handwriting
    disturbances in speech (ranging from stammering through stuttering)

    These primary consequences can then transform into various differing secondary consequences:
    inferiority complexes
    insecurity
    introversion
    overcompensation through heightened performance
    contrariness; an oppositional and provocational manner; (e.g. the class clown in school; and the persistent, compulsive wise-cracker in adulthood)
    various distinctive disorders in behavior
    bedwetting and nail-biting
    emotional problems lasting into adulthood with neurotic and/or psycho-somatic symptomology
    disorders in the personality profile

    I suffer from quite a few of the above problems though it may also be attributed to my chronic ill health. I would like to know if any of you can correlate to the above consequences. I certainly can

    Comment by rajit roy | March 31, 2012 | Reply

    • I have some of the above. Even though this article helped me understand myself, I dont think it would help my mum to understand me. She convinced herself that switching is not a big deal. She thinks that if people who are forced to switch due to lost of limb can manage why not me. I keep getting compared to my right-handed sister. Keep getting questioned why am I so different and etc.

      Comment by Geetha Naido (@angelusPiper) | April 9, 2012 | Reply

  28. I’m a leftie and even though I really appreciate the above information, I am reluctant to believe that the gif of the lady spinning really works to determine your dominant brain. Perhaps my “dominant brain” or perspective blinds me from seeing it another way but, for me…it isn’t about focussing more to see her rotating clockwise/anti-clockwise, the gif does it every few minutes accordingly. To make things simpler, just look at her foot on the ground and watch as it turns one direction (keep watching for a few minutes) and you’ll see how seamlessly she starts turning in the other direction.

    I’m proud to be a leftie and feel lucky that even though I am of Asian ethnicity I wasn’t forced to use my right hand as a child because my Dad was more influenced by Western thought..I do realise that I see the world quite differently compared to others, but is that really because of “handedness” or is it my ideology, upbringing and all those internal/external factors? Some say that the whole theory of left-right brain dominance is a myth now since both sides are connected with the corpus callosum and both sides rely on each other in most circumstances.

    Have a look at TED ideas on youtube, there are videos on the need for a ‘learning revolution’ and others related to the brain as well.

    Comment by myriadhearts | April 7, 2012 | Reply

  29. Hi, I believe I was a forced to be right handed. I’m indecisive, and whenever I was in school, I never really thought I fit in either right or left brain categories.

    I usually do things with my left hand– like hold cigarettes or yo-yoing- and I’m often confused about how to hold a knife and fork, I get right and left directions mixed up a lot, and overall, I have a hard time forming conclusions.

    Now that I know where that stems from, I’m also concerned with anxiety. Does this split put anxiety in my brain? Should I get this checked out at all? I don’t feel like simply going to my left hand will help me at all, only confuse me even more =(

    Comment by Katie | April 19, 2012 | Reply

    • I doubt there is any need for getting help. All you need to do right now is adjust. Even I get directions mixed up. For example, I know the right direction for Left and Right in English, but when I have to say Left or Right in Urdu (Pakistan’s national language), I get the directions mixed up. Some of the other problems are already listed in the blog that I face but I try to adjust as much as possible and it is working for me to some extent.
      As long as your limitations are not a burden on yourself and to others around you, you are fine and healthy in any and every possible way :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | May 22, 2012 | Reply

  30. Hi, I love your article. When I was about 6-7 I used my left hand for most things but many years later (now teenager) I use my right hand for all things. My handwriting is awful with left now. I have been studying that spinning woman and I found that I can literally think it to go the other way and it does, though I loose grip often. I can move my eyes anti clockwise and the woman after a couple seconds will go anticlockwise. Is this meaning that it’s using the right side if my brain? (I assume I’m right handed because I been using it like it’s the dominant one since around the time I said earlier?) what does this mean???

    Comment by dan | April 28, 2012 | Reply

    • I believe you have become a strong ambidextrous who now favors right hand more than left. As long as you are able to work to your satisfaction with right hand, I don’t believe you have anything to worry about. Just keep that left hand of yours busy as well, you never know when you would need its strength (particularly in sports).

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | May 22, 2012 | Reply

  31. Okay, this is weird. The figure/image never completes a rotation. It rotates to the left, changes direction half way and rotates to the right. Is this a joke or do I have a brain disorder? (I mean seriously)

    Comment by Jay | May 2, 2012 | Reply

    • i think there is something to this dancing lady thing, it changes on me also!

      Comment by Diger Phelps | May 13, 2012 | Reply

    • I don’t think this is a brain disorder. It hasn’t happen to me but I think you are able to focus it at your will.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | May 22, 2012 | Reply

  32. It took about 5 seconds for me to change the direction of the figure from clock-wise to counter-clockwise, and another few seconds to change it back. I tried this a few more times to see if I came with about the same conclusion and I sort did. I remember when I was in about pre-school or a little younger, I still remember my aunt hitting my hand, saying I need to use my right hand. Throughout school I’ve always felt my left hand felt..I don’t know..more controlled, I guess. I use spoons and forks, etc, with my left hand and write with my right. I usually bounce a ball with my left too, even though I could bounce with my right too, I would prefer my left. I told my friends this, when they noticed during lunch one day I was using my left hand and they said I was weird. But thats okay. If weird is being me, and my friends accept it, I guess I like being weird.

    Comment by Michelle Tong | May 3, 2012 | Reply

    • That’s the spirit. As long as you accept yourself and others around you have no problem with that, you are good to go :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | May 22, 2012 | Reply

  33. I was born left handed. I was forced by teachers to use my right hand. They didnt have a left handed teacher to show me how to wright properly with my left hand. I have often thought this is why I am the way I am. I’m Passionately logical. I think there is more of an issue here then others would like to believe. When I watch the rotating woman, she moves from clockwise to counterclockwise in an instant & back again. I really dont have to focus or concentrate. She goes back & forth rather quickly sometimes.I’m still not clear on what that means. May I have some input, Please?

    Comment by LInda Stapleton | May 11, 2012 | Reply

    • I think your situation is same as mine with minor differences. I think you are more ambidextrous than me and are able to move the figure more easily, showing that your both halves of the brain are close to each other in dominance. If I had to guess, I would say my right brain is 60% and left brain is 40% dominant. You can be close to 55% and 45% in dominance. This is only a possibility and more can only be found through psychological tests that find out brain dominance.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | May 22, 2012 | Reply

  34. i went to a speech therapist in 2nd 3rd and 4th grade, I was forced to be a righty by my parents because its a right handed world. My penmanship is terrible,, my right side of my body has been injured dramaticly compared to my left.. I was watching the dancing lady and at first she was counter clock wise and then she switched, so I focused and got her to switch back and forth counter and clock wise. That was trippy. I would like to learn more on this subject

    i

    Comment by Diger Phelps | May 13, 2012 | Reply

  35. helo,even i m a forced right handed person just like u all.i discovered it today at the age of twenty.m an mbbs student studying in india.my profs. have told to figure out our dominant brain and utilise the skills accordingly in studies.m confused n really dont know how to work upon this.i imagine certain things,mug up a few chapters,some topics need to b remembered pictorically………….i dont know exactly which strategy is gonna help me.i just wish i wasn’t forced to be a right handed.

    Comment by silvermist | May 14, 2012 | Reply

    • IF you are a force convert, be sure to know that your right side of the brain has more dominance (even if slightly) than the left side. This means you are more easily able to remember concepts, pictures, maps and such. Anything related to creativity is relatively easier to handle by you, so try to use that to your advantage. As for chapters that you may have to memorize, well I don’t know how that can be helped. I am in my final year of MBA studies and the only two things that have troubled my entire higher education days are:\

      – Memorizing
      – Mathematics, Accounting and Finance courses

      I just can’t deal with them.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | May 22, 2012 | Reply

  36. the image is either not consistent, and turns the other direction on a timer, or im bugging out. but if you watch it constantly for a few minutes you can watch it switch directions. or im freaking myself out

    anyway i was forced to swtich from left to right hand as a kid, and i think it gave me strengths from both sides of the brain.

    Comment by Tony Batts | June 2, 2012 | Reply

  37. I have found this article and comments very interesting. I was forced to write with my right hand when I first went to school, but after 5 years we moved and I was able to choose, so I now write with both hands. My left produces the better handwriting so I would say is dominant and but when I teach I write with either hand on the board and students find it fascinating. What disturbed me most was when my son when to school (four years ago), he hadn’t got a dominant hand, but preferred his left. At home we didn’t worry. After his first term, he was switched by his teacher to right handed as the school said he had to make a preference, yet I believe they should not have forced the issue and let him use both until he was ready to choose or as the volume of work increased a dominant side emerged. He began to have issues with school, which now I believe is partially due to pushing him to use one hand. We have moved him, yet he is still struggling to write right handed, even though his new school is trying to help him use either. I think the whole early year teaching community need to be taught how to deal with handiness, so they do not cause problems

    Comment by niwlog | June 2, 2012 | Reply

  38. I am a born lefty I was forced over. I wish my parents read this 17years ago

    Comment by Angie | June 6, 2012 | Reply

  39. AWESOME!!! I can make the girl move both ways!!!!!

    Comment by Brittney | June 16, 2012 | Reply

  40. This is a great theory told..I was born a left handed but developed a desire to use both hands. Today I enjoy the unknown potential to use both hands when writing. I hope I am both a cross dominant and an Ambidextrous by the complex of how i do things. I am really relieved of a big load towards why I find it hard when some judgment which normally leave me at cross road junction of final decision making and taking risks in most cases. I hope there is more to be analyzed through deeper research.
    Timothy

    Comment by Timothy Musyoka | June 17, 2012 | Reply

  41. Your “test” is an optical illusion and has nothing to do with the dominant side of someone’s brain at all. It is all a trick in the visual in the visual system based on the fact that she’s only a silhouette and has no depth cues. Without depth cues, your brain doesn’t quite know how to process the moving image, so she changes directions. And science doesn’t even know why it happens.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/04/28/the-truth-about-the-spinning-dancer/

    Comment by Crysta Kleinatland | June 24, 2012 | Reply

    • Thank you Crysta for bringing this to my notice. It explains a few things, however the explanation leaves much to desire. Maybe the image of spinning lade is not the right indicator regarding dominant use of brain half, but if science cannot explain why it happens then neither can we simply right-off. Maybe there is a relationship, maybe there isn’t. Until a more concrete answer is found, we can let it be for the time being.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | July 18, 2012 | Reply

  42. Hi. I don’t know if it’s been asked, but is it too late for me to try to be left-handed again? What I mean is, even though I’ve been forced to be right-handed, forcing my non-dominant left brain to be dominant, does that mean my right brain has eventually lost dominancy over these 21 years? Or is my right brain still the dominant hemisphere and I’ll be able to ‘revive’ it by practising to write with my left hand? Is it too late? Great article by the way.

    Comment by Jolyn | July 8, 2012 | Reply

    • No, there is nothing like too late. Another poster on this article is 45 years old and I believe she has started to use left-hand again. I do not know if starting to write with left-hand again will revive your right-brain dominancy again or not but it will certainly help be more yourself than you have ever been. I haven’t started writing or such but I now prefer to carry stuff and weight (bags etc) in my left-hand rather than right. I sometimes find it awkward but for some reason it feels like this is how it should have been.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | July 18, 2012 | Reply

  43. By this article it would appear I’m left handed, although I write with my right hand, I do most of my duties in work with my left hand, even simple things eating with a knife and fork, yet from my knowledge I was never forced to change my dominant hand? My mother is right handed, and my father is left, I don’t think I’m Ambidextrous as many tasks seem impossible with my right, as with my left.. But this article has opened a world of questions. Is there any other way to test yourself?

    Comment by Christina | July 17, 2012 | Reply

    • I don’t know how else we can test but there must be psychological tests that can determine many answers to questions one may have. Contacting a psychologist or relevant professional would be ideal to know more about this.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | July 18, 2012 | Reply

  44. It keeps on switching first its clckwise then anti then clockwise again which part of the brain am i dominant in?

    Comment by Tyler | July 22, 2012 | Reply

    • If it keeps switching, it probably means there is little difference between the two halves of your brain and are probably ambidextrous.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | August 28, 2012 | Reply

  45. Its how you look at the image. Do you try to determine which way shes spinning from her Head to her Toes (clockwise) or do you view from her feet to her Head (anti clockwise). I can view both but it does take a little focus switching back and forth. I was converted from Left to right as a toddler. I asked my parents why, My mother couldnt give me an answer. All thru out elementary, I had a hard time writing with my right hand. I used to hold my pencil like I was toddler full handed and still till this day I hold my pencil awkward and my penmanship is horrible. I’m going to try train myself to use my left hand again and see if it benefits me being I was born left handed. Also based on the list of attributes of being left handed and right, I have combination of both.

    Comment by Jason | August 9, 2012 | Reply

  46. I LOOKED AT THE LADY FOR MORE THAN TEN MINUTES, I COULD NOT SEE HER TURN ANTI CLOCKWISE. I SAW ONLY HER TURN CLOCKWISE. WHICH SIDE OF MY HEAD IS MY BRAIN?

    Comment by Maryam Ufwil Abubakar | August 28, 2012 | Reply

    • As mentioned above the picture, moving clock-wise means you are right-brain dominant and if you are unable to see her turn anti-clockwise, that means you the difference between left and right brain is high. The more right brain dominant you are, the greater will be the chances that the lady will NOT move anti-clockwise.

      However, as one poster brought this to my attention in the comments section, this picture is not a reliable source to find the dominant side of your brain and probably some of the complex scientific theories do not even recognize any divide between the two halves.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | August 28, 2012 | Reply

  47. Good article…It’s quite simple – if you’re left handed but raised right handed, whenever you write or draw etc, you think about ‘how’ you’re writing, rather than ‘what’ you’re writing….same with drawing, playing guitar, sports etc. It’s a huge self-imposed limit or disconnect. Whether you’re trying to learn or create something, that limit of ‘how’ vs ‘intuition’, how should I record vs intuitively record notes/music/ideas/illustrations etc is rarely breached, or completely overcome.

    Quite frankly, had I been raised left handed, I probably would never have scored less than 100% on any test. I more than likely would have picked up a scholarship to MIT or Harvard or something. Instead, I spent my whole life trying to figure out or copy a bloody penmanship style (hahaha), which I was never able to do (until I started writing left handed). Even now, I can’t write cursive particularly well with either hand. As a guitar player, I only managed to be an average rhythm guitarist, but as a lefty, I could have easily played any style. Same as an athlete. It’s pretty staggering how it affects our life. BTW, they should promote left handed pianos.

    So moms and dads out there, if your kids a lefty, be happy, or they could end up like me…

    Comment by lefty | September 1, 2012 | Reply

    • You pretty much summed up what we go through because of the disconnect. I really wish I could have learned guitar, but I had opted not to and instead tried to improve on things I already know. That didn’t go so well, but if I was not switched the scenario might have been different.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | September 5, 2012 | Reply

      • It’s never too late…I made the determined switch from righty guitar to the rather painful process of learning to play guitar left handed. Still working on it, but after about 2 years, I can now play the way I only dreamed about as a righty, which is to say, completely intuitively. I don’t have to think about placing my fingers on the frets, it just happens. As a righty, that wasn’t the case. But as I’m now close to 50, the desire isn’t really there to master the guitar.

        Strange world we live in…

        Comment by lefty | October 11, 2012 | Reply

        • This is quite inspirational. I had given up learning to write with my left-hand after a few days of trying, but after reading your comment I feel like starting once again.

          Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | October 11, 2012 | Reply

  48. hi there.my name is makda amine.to keep it short i was left handed and not the opposite and i did some reading and found out that writing with my right hand doesn’t change anything except the fact that the right brain can handle multitask but when u start using right hand thoughts and some other activities doesn’t fully express themselves. and this leads to speech difficulties and stuff.but i think we should train our original way of writing don’t you think.i mean as long as it has some negative effect on us we should change it. there are some sites that help u should check it out.

    Comment by makda | September 6, 2012 | Reply

    • True Makda, forcing to use the other hand can lead to speech difficulties and expression of thoughts and ideas is no longer easy. The problem that we face at this stage of our life is that switching back to left hand is no longer simple. It’s really tough, can be frustrating and the negative effects may even multiply. The best way is to not force the switching of hand from early childhood.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | September 13, 2012 | Reply

  49. Hi. Can anybody tell me if you can still be left handed even if your right eye dominant? I ask because ive spent all my life right handed & play golf right handed. I just started sports fitness to improve my swing flexibility & the fitness instructor said the way my body followed instruction seemed unnatural for a righty. She seems to think that from a young age I’ve been forced into being a righty. A lot of what she says makes sense but I’m right eye dominant.

    Comment by Aaron Cobb | September 13, 2012 | Reply

    • From what I know, being right eye dominant makes you left-brain dominant and that means you are right-handed. Right eye dominance coordinates very well with your right hand and therefor there is little chance you were left-handed. Unless you are ambidextrous or very close to be ambidextrous that switching hand is not a problem, there is little possibility of you being left-handed.
      What I would suggest is that you take more tests to find out if you really are right eye dominant or if there is a possibility that both your eyes are dominant or maybe left eye is dominant.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | September 13, 2012 | Reply

  50. I found your article very interesting, ever since i was a kid, i was always bad at sports in school during gym. we would have to play softball volleyball etc, so when it was my turn up to bat i would get up there grab the bat and i would almost always hear the coach or gym teacher say are you left handed, I always want to bat left handed so they would say are you right handed or left handed and i would say right because i was told i was left handed and they would make me bat right handed which totally felt wield and i would strike out . I was a very easy going kid . as i got older, i would cont to do many things and people would ask me are you right habded or left cause i would always go right to my left hand first. In high school the only subjects i would get A’s or B’s in would be Art and English . I was in special ed classes for math and science . I look at the list of the right/ left brain functions and shake my head I wish i would have know about it 25 years ago. I have taken so learning tests to see why i have such a hard time I learned I am a global learner i like to see the whole picture . I love the arts i love photography I always loved reading I always had a fantasy about being a author .

    Comment by sophie | September 19, 2012 | Reply

    • Most of us wish the same thing, knowing all this many years ago would certainly have changed us in many ways. This combination of left and right has certainly impacted us and our natural balance has been altered. I have the same situation, I have been quite weak in Mathematics and subjects that require a lot of calculation. Arts and related subjects are much easier and enjoyable for me, particularly those that appeal to my creative side. Life would certainly be different if we had known this so many years ago.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | September 20, 2012 | Reply

  51. Hello, I have been using my right hand for 24 years, I am a Muslim and our culture favors right handness, which it was encouraged by family, so I didn’t really get the chance to use my hands in their natural order.
    A recent experience made me notice that I was a naturally born Left-Handed.
    I noticed that I was very strong with my left hand, I throw balls to long distance without effort with my left hand, but I lack accuracy, When engaging in a physical activity my right side always tire more easily than the left (now I know why I always felt exhausted with minimal physical activity), Also I write with my Right hand, which I was taught to do all these years, I found it hard to try to switch now to write with my left (lousy handwriting).
    Would you consider me a Left-Handed or is just illusions?

    Comment by Hany | September 20, 2012 | Reply

    • I am a Muslim as well and understand the whole family situation regarding right-handedness. In fact I have seen how family members actually promote and even force children to switch hands, so I can imagine your own experience in this regard. I cannot say if you are left handed or right, you can find out by determining your dominant eye. There are links on this blog and you can search for more over Google. If you are left-eye dominant then you are ‘suppose’ to be left-handed and vice versa.
      So far the symptoms you have mentioned, I have experienced them myself except the fact that my left-side has remained weak. I can’t pick more weights with my left compared to right and obviously have higher accuracy with right-hand due to lifelong experience, however I am considered a thinker among friends and family and my whenever I am in my thinking mode, it’s my left hand on which I rest my chin or place left-hand index finger on my forehead (it feels natural to do so, tried with right hand and it felt completely off and awkward).

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | September 20, 2012 | Reply

  52. I used to be left handed but for some reason, I started using my right one. I was in an Adventist nursery but I don’t know if I was “forced” to switch (it was the early 90’s and I remember they said Halloween was evil so it’s a possibility) or that I thought I was doing something wrong writing with my left hand when all my classmates were right-handed. My mom says she didn’t notice at all but she remembers I was very clumsy. I’m still clumsy, and I have terrible handwriting. My parents and teachers tried everything to fix my horrible handwriting but they gave up when I was in middle school. I still write like a left handed person but with my right hand. I wanted to be an artist but I ended studying economics and I’m not very good at math but I love history and literature. Thankfully, I love the social side of my career but I hate finance and accounting.

    Comment by Maria | September 21, 2012 | Reply

    • Your story regarding handwriting and subject interest is pretty much same as mine. It is curious to know you don’t remember why you switched hands. Perhaps peer pressure? I remember it was considered odd to write with left-hand in classroom and other students often wondered out loud why would anyone write with the ‘wrong’ hand. As for handwriting, mine is legible but bad nonetheless. All these years, from my final days at school (back in 2005) until just over a year ago, I used to believe that my handwriting is bad because of Cambridge education system ( O and A levels). It was an observation from some teachers that they see too many students from Cambridge system having bad handwriting compared to the local Matriculation system where you get marks for neatness and handwriting in the exam papers. Only after knowing that I was born left-handed did I began to know the true story and can relate to the pain you feel whenever you see your own handwriting.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | September 21, 2012 | Reply

      • It probably was peer pressure. I remember that nobody else in my class was left handed. I also remember that I held the pencil with my right hand in a weird way, like a chisel in a 90° angle. The funny thing is that I could only write in caps with my right hand. I don’t remember why though. I wrote normally with my left until I was eight or so, when I began to get used to write with my right hand. Anyway, it was an informative read, many thanks for your article!

        Comment by Maria | September 26, 2012 | Reply

        • No problem, and thank you for your comment. It is always enlightening to know experiences of others, it helps in developing perspective and know that we are not alone :)

          Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | September 27, 2012 | Reply

  53. Hi, I am really wondering..if Im supposed to be left handed or right handed…I write with my left hand..(terribly)..and do everything else with my right hand, sports, cut, drive..when I looked at the image of the girl..first it went counter clock wise, then turned and went clockwise..there she remained…when I try to write with my right hand its actually pretty good. my step father used to try to switch my hand from left to right..but now im wondering if I am supposed to be right?????

    Comment by Sheila Larson | October 17, 2012 | Reply

    • u r leftie man…..

      Comment by rahul narasimman | November 3, 2012 | Reply

    • Sorry for the late reply, I have been travelling a lot and also working on my thesis and upcoming exams, so not able to give proper time to the blog. It is interesting to know that you do everything with right hand and write terribly with left hand. The figure also moved both clockwise and counter-clockwise for you, showing possible signs of you being ambidextrous. It is a possibility that you are primarily a right-handed person with ambidextrous qualities or someone who has turned into a right handed person with some leanings towards left-side (like me). Either can be possible in your case.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | November 4, 2012 | Reply

  54. hey I’m a born left handed guy but after my first grade my father forced me to change to right handed in writing as he thought that all lefties are bad in hand writing …now in my 11th grade i am so afraid of my muscles my left hand muscles are very large and my right on are very small….now I’m not even having stamina to write single essay with my right hand….i have to switch between hands to relax my right…….its just an onerous task to write some 3 paras continuously with my right….i feel like my right hand is bloodless…..

    Comment by rahul narasimman | November 3, 2012 | Reply

    • Rahul, you are definitely a left-handed person and if there is a such a vast difference between the actual muscles of your arms than it is better to switch completely to left. If you are in 11th grade, this means you are still a teenager and you have, compared to us, a much easier time to make a complete switch. Despite born leftie, my left arm is weaker than right due to less usage and that has been a major reason why I am unable to use it as primary arm to lift heavier stuff or play sports, relying on my right as has been a habit since childhood. The sooner you switch, the better it would be for you.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | November 4, 2012 | Reply

  55. Well you probably just almost hate to see one more comment after having so many but I feel I need to add mine as well. I was born left handed, just like my Dad, but when I was about five I fell off a horse and broke my left arm. The day I got the cast off; when we got home I was so glad to have the cast removed that I did a somersault in the front yard and broke it again and had to go and get another cast. After having my left arm immobilized in a cast twice in a row, I was now using my right hand. There were things I still did though that showed left handed tendencies and some I still do. I sometimes eat left handed, I can shoot a gun either left or right handed, sometimes I will write with my right hand and erase with my left hand, etc. but I find I will get confused about which side certain things go on. My mom used to tell me I was putting on my pins (brooch) on the wrong side, things like that and I have had people tell me I do things backwards. That is really the reason that I am writing all this, I wonder if others that have had to switch from left hand to right hand, have run into issues with this confusion. I know I am left eye dominant. When you mentioned the thing about left and right brain I know that as a child I was MUCH more given to daydreams, fairy tales, art, etc and then I stopped and become much more left brained.

    Comment by nan58 | November 6, 2012 | Reply

    • Hahahaha, no way. I know there are a lot of comments on this post but for some reason I enjoy reading the input of new visitors and get to learn about their experiences. Yours is unique as well where you, due to your repeated injuries, ended up using right hand which eventually became your dominant hand. While someone like me who was “trained” to be right-handed and has experiences mixed feelings throughout life, you learned to be right handed due to unavoidable circumstances and comparing to the situations we have faces, there are similarities in the experiences. To this day I enjoy reading stories and attracted to art, but then all of a sudden my mind shifts and I look for order and patterns which is left-brain strengths.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | November 6, 2012 | Reply

  56. I am terribly confused as to what to do with my daughter. She is 6 years old and in first grade. Since she was a baby she always reached with her left hand. I myself was left handed until the first grade, at which time they switched me to right, I am now 40 years old. I am right handed when writing, but do everything else with my left side. I have always had coordination problems and am terrible at sports and math. My daughter is so much like me. Loves art, reading, sign language, and is very theatrical, but also very uncoordinated. I believe that she is supposed to be left handed, but her teachers want to switch her to her right. The say, and I have tested her also, that she is more right oriented. She kicks, steps up, and looks through things with her right side. Her ear dominance and throwing balls however is always with the left. I am concerned that if we switch her to the right hand she will develop unnecessary problems. Her teachers are insistent that she should be right handed and I am having a hard time standing my ground since she does seem to have cross dominance right now. My question is, if she has both dominances, brain wise right now and has always written with her left, should we keep her using her left hand or switch? Also if we do keep her left or switch her to right are there any exercises we can do with her to help her establish her brain dominance either way. I really want to do the right thing and don’t want to be biased by my own personal experiences.

    Comment by Sasha | November 10, 2012 | Reply

    • Sasha, I will give you two honest advises.

      1 – Let your daughter decide, neither you nor the teachers. Let her sort through dominance issues instead of forcing her or guessing which “handedness” she should have. If she is ambidextrous, it will appear in time. As I had mentioned in my article, my childhood friend Ahmed wrote with left hand but played sports with right hand and foot. He’s ambidextrous and was much better with maths than me but weaker in languages. In fact, now that I recall, he used to be top in the class in languages in grades 2 and 3 but his interest began to fall in them, he increasingly became more logical and his interest in science piqued while languages fell. It was opposite for me as I was good with arts and maths as child and relatively bad with languages, but in time I because strong in languages and bad at maths and drawings. It’s all due to handedness confusion and forcing us to use different hands may certainly impacted us.

      2 – You have the ideal opportunity to consult a child psychologist for this. There is no one better to answer your query than a trained and experienced psychologist who can save your daughter’s future. If possible, don’t wait any long and get in contact with a specialist and consult with him/her. The answers and suggestions/recommendations you will get from them would be much more valuable than any other source you can find. The psychologist may even have tests to correctly diagnose your daughter’s handedness and this might be all you need to put her life on the right track.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | November 11, 2012 | Reply

  57. I also was forced to be a right handed person but when i focused at the image i can see the figure all of a sudden change direction. So what does it means?

    Comment by nice | November 17, 2012 | Reply

  58. I want to learn how to write with both of my hands though would I still be able to write with my right hand of I write with my left daily until it is neat? Should I practice my left hand writing but write with my right hand once in a while just in case?

    Comment by daryan | November 17, 2012 | Reply

    • Daryan, your body remembers the skills it has learned. If you practice writing with left hand, your right hand will still remember how it wrote so there will be no effect on your right hand writing. Learning to write from left hand would be the challenge and it will take a lot of time and patience to bring the writing up to a mark for neatness. I wish you luck for that :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 11, 2013 | Reply

  59. And my hand writing is so poor even though i have writing subjects in elementary. I hate math ever since because I always get low grades but when I focused really hard I can get. And after Ive reviewed the next day i easily forget it. Even vocabulary words that i just been read after a few minutes its easily been erase from my memory. I’m such a daydreamer even though i’m doing something or listening to the discussion of my professors i tend to daydream and i cant stop doing it. I cant focused at anything, and do things at one tiime and I’m easily irritated, have many insecurities and low self-esteem. But I remember as a Kindergarten i used my left hand and doing basic math problems easily and after switched to be a right hander I started to be a slow learner at math. And to add up I’m not that good academically just balanced but I’m not really creative so what does this explains?

    Comment by nice | November 17, 2012 | Reply

    • Sorry for such a late response. I was slow learner as well and been that way most of my life. What I lacked in academics I balanced it with my hobbies. Remember, your creativity needs an outlet. It is up to you to provide the outlet and it can be in terms of writing, painting, music … any form of creative expression can become an outlet for your creativity. For me it was story writing and surprisingly this has still stuck even to this day. With computers you don’t need to be left hander or right hander for typing. That is why I am able to enjoy blogging and short story writing. Find yourself an outlet for your creativity and that will more than make up for your academic short comings, trust me on that :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 11, 2013 | Reply

  60. I was born left-handed. My parents said they forced me to use my right hand until I learned to use it.. I think I am okay..I used to be really good in math back when I was young. But now, wow, even basic arithmetic eludes me. I love science and languages. Actually I chose journalism instead of biology, and I can draw, paint and such although I think in most cases like with balance and the use of the eyes I use my left more. People say I am creative. Some would say I’m too conventional. I don’t really know if I am really right of left.. Anyway, I first saw the girl move counter-clockwise and then clockwise and I could ‘make’ her turn vice versa. Though that gave me a slight headache :)

    Comment by hitomibeth | November 20, 2012 | Reply

    • Follow up..I once took a test in college for this psychoanalysis thing (forgot what it was)..it was based on a drawing. And the evaluator told me that I had a very hard time making decisions. Even now. I guess sometimes I would plan it in my head to do this and that and when I have to do it, I would be so tired as to have to repeat it again – this time in reality. My mom studied for Chemical Engineering and my brothers are good with numbers..but ever since I switched to being right-handed, I struggled a lot in math. Perhaps I didn’t get my mom’s genes or something. My dad is good with his hands and I got that from him too.. Anyway..about the switching, would that mean that the part of me being ‘psychologically incapacitated’ as what the evaluator said (maybe she said a different word I forgot) be the result of the switching?

      Comment by hitomibeth | November 20, 2012 | Reply

      • From my understanding, yes. Switching caused you to become ambidextrous (able to use both left and right) and the problem ambidextrous people face is the inability to make decisions. That is because your left brain is giving a logical solution to the problem while the right brain is providing creative solution, and both end up warring with each other which leaves you confused. It’s like a tug-of-war in your head that you don’t realize is taking place.

        Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 11, 2013 | Reply

  61. I feel you. I was born a lefty however mom trained me to use the right hand because according to hervthis world was created for r handed…I grew up fine.

    Comment by beth | November 25, 2012 | Reply

  62. I am 74 years young and before entering 1st grade was forced to use my right hand although I was born left-handed. My parents were divorced and my Mother, sister and I were living w/ my Great-grandmother and she was the one who worked w/ me to change. In those days children who were left-handed were thought to be mildly retarded and she didn’t want anyone thinking her great-grandaughter might be retarded mildly or not. Consequently, I had difficulty w/ studies all through school. Years later I did read an article that seemed to indicate that because I was forced to change it had affected my ability to study. I am creative, love to solve puzzles of all kinds, and I might add that my sister who is 2 years younger is also left-handed. I am unable to use a knife w/ my right hand and I deal cards only with my left…also sew, comb my hair, brush my teeth w/ my left hand. When I was 20 my Mother and Step-Dad had a son (My half-brother) and he is also left-handed. No one ever attempted to change them. It is interesting to note that my sister and I had the same parents whereas my brother, sister and I share the same Mother but his Father was not our Father….. consequently, the left-handed trait must stem frm my Mom’s side. I;m so glad I came upon this site because it certainly does make a lot of sense.

    Comment by Melodie | December 26, 2012 | Reply

  63. Last summer I started a job, that made my right wrist hurts all the time, had no strength even to do simple activities, so just switched to my left hand. And it wasn’t a big deal for me, of course, I was a lil clumsy, but I’m right handed all my life! So my granny told me I started to write with my left hand, when I was a kid, but she showed me the “right” way, no matter it wasn’t wrong to be a lefty in the 90s. I do some activities as a lefty all my life, but haven’t noticed – holding heavy things, my cell phone, pour out bottles, drinking, eating food, that should be held in the hand….. I have the same handwriting with my left hand, but still can’t write as fast as with my right hand…… And I have a master degree in economy, but I’m the worst mathematician ever, no matter I’ve tried so hard to get better, I was wondering if it’s possible to be so dull, haha.
    In the end, I was born on 26th of October too, that’s kinda supernatural, haha

    Comment by Dimana | January 8, 2013 | Reply

    • Seriously, this does sound like supernatural :D
      Same date of birth and same situation regards to Economics. Though I am an MBA now but Economic subjects have been one of my favorites. It’s only the maths part that is the downside for me but Economics itself is really wonderful :)

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 11, 2013 | Reply

      • Well, I’m not pretty sure I was born to be an economist, but I’m sure I was born on 26.10.1988 ;) Are you my astral twin?

        Comment by Dimana | January 11, 2013 | Reply

        • Maybe, if the two years of difference can be considered negligible :D

          Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 11, 2013 | Reply

          • I used to be unhappy, coz I was one of the youngest kids in the class, my classmates drove cars, but I was too young….Today I don’t feel sorry I was born in the end of the year, haha. And we have a deal, only if u are 2 years younger, haha ;)

            Comment by Dimana | January 12, 2013 | Reply

            • Well, I am 2 years older than you but in the end it will boil down to the same thing … astral twins :D

              Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 19, 2013 | Reply

  64. I’m right-handed but I see the figure moving counter-clockwise. Does this mean I was born left-handed but was forced to use my right hand?

    Comment by Lily | January 10, 2013 | Reply

    • That could be a possibility but to really make sure that is the case, try an eye test to find out your dominant eye. There are a couple of tests mentioned in the comments. If you turn out to be a left-eye dominant, then that means you really were born left hander but were switched to right hand.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 11, 2013 | Reply

      • Thanks! So I tried an eye test and it turns out I’m left-eye dominant and I’m right-brain dominant. I also have the same symptoms you had. I’m clumsy, my hand-writing is terrible, it takes me a while to get used to sports, and I daydream a lot. So, what do I do know? Should I just focus on getting better at these things or should I start using my left hand or what? What do you do?

        Comment by Lily | February 19, 2013 | Reply

        • If you can, try practicing with your left hand and see if you can start writing with it. Also, since you know you are left-eye dominant, you have natural inclination towards creativity. You can now better plan your future, focus more on creative stuff and even start doing conventional stuff more creatively. What i did was focus more on creativity and it has been fruitful for me so far.

          Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 24, 2013 | Reply

  65. Dear author,

    i came to realize that i was naturally a lefty hand. My parents changed my hand to right when i was very small. I was the worst at studying. I am always in a fantasy world. I don’t like mathematics. I have stuttering speech problems. My hand writing is very slow and very dirty. I take too much time to take decisions .I am very slow and lazy i don’t know why? . I am not good at drawing and arts. Teacher and school principles always complain that i don’t study seriously. Ok with great difficulty i passed bachelor university but with low grades. I joined a company people in my company say it to me that i shall act more maturely & act like a kid., They told me that even a 14 years old kid act maturely than me. Even if i work harder for them. I have more technical knowledge than others seniors :(

    I am very bad at sports. I am not creative. Please guide me what shall i do?

    I will start to practice with left hand writing? one hour every daily?

    I shall try to play sports with left hand?

    Please guide me what shall i do i wished that i were never borned no matter how hard i try to improve my life it gets worse!!!!!!

    Note :- I see the dancing woman picture moving clock wise. I am 24 year old male. My life is cursed what ever i to do i can’ achieve it?

    Comment by kenshiro | January 23, 2013 | Reply

    • Kenshiro

      From your comment I get the feeling that even though you faced the same problem as I and some of the other commentors have faced, that is not the only limitation at your end. It seems there are two additional shortcomings:
      1- Lack of confidence
      2- Lack of motivation

      These may have arisen due to the forceful switch to right hand but many other factors must have caused the situation to get worse. For example, even though I am not good at sports like most natural right-handers, I tried to mitigate the shortcoming through hard work. That is the reason I became captain of my university’s Table Tennis teams. Other than that, I have also been captain of Athletics, Badminton and Counter Strike teams of my school/university during my academic life. I managed these through sheer hard work and was rewarded as a result.

      I believe that you need more confidence building measures and require motivation to do better in life. If practicing with left-hand can help, do that. Otherwise I suggest you read books on confidence building, watch videos about it or even start some practices like meditation or Yoga for mind relaxation (this greatly improves focus, I know it because meditation helped me a lot in building my focus).

      If possible, I suggest you read the book “Awaken the giant within” by Anthony Robbins. You may read any other book as well that serves the same purpose.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | January 25, 2013 | Reply

  66. This is awseome!!! When I saw the animation I thought to myself “yea right.. There is no way this figure can move clock-wise.” I then starred in it for quite a while concentrating and trying to change its direction. And it changed. I freaked out a little because it was kind of weird. It was hard the first time but then i figured it out and could change it almost at will.

    It’s awesome. I will definitely show it to others and by the way. Nice post!

    Comment by Gal | February 1, 2013 | Reply

  67. Great site. I found out I was switched when I read a report about my experience in kindergarten. It said that “Doug is ambidextous, therefore, we’re encouraging the use of his right hand.” This was 1966. It royally messed up my life, but God is good and I started to learn to write lefty and play tennis and racquetball lefty and I have gotten very good at all of these skills. I have noticed that as I get better at lefty skills, my righ handed abilities in all of these activities also improves. I became a good tennis and racquetball player righty through very hard work, but lefty is SO much easier and more natural. I will continue to work very hard to regain my lefty skills in life and I am much happier and more content. People who ‘force’ do a great deal of harm to the people the switch. I have zero memory of being switched.

    Comment by Douglas Pumroy | February 2, 2013 | Reply

  68. Unlike most, I “converted” to be a lefty when I was young. Injured my right hand and I had nth to do, so I colored with my left. Afterwards, I became a lefty and my right hand couldn’t do a thing. (I was 4 yo back then). So I’ve been lefty for 11 years, then I practiced my right hand. To my surprise, my right hand could draw better than my left!! My left hand couldn’t draw to save my life, but my right handed drawings were marvelous although I never had any training. Since then, I practiced everything in my right hand, and now, I’m ambidextrous :) I can write, play badminton, dribble a ball and shave using either hand. Being ambidextrous is the best :)

    Comment by Gerald | February 2, 2013 | Reply

    • Oh, and a side note. I’m a prodigy in both maths and arts. But my right hand cant count as fast as my left and my left hand cant draw as good as my right. So was I born ambidextrous?

      Comment by Gerald | February 2, 2013 | Reply

      • I don’t think you were born ambidextrous. When you are young, you can be “trained” to do something which means you can learn to do something and get better at it as time passes by. You are fast counting with left hand because you have used it for a long time, it has the necessary muscle development and neuron connections for speed and strength, responding to you faster. But since you are natural born right hander, your right hand draws better. Since you have used left hand for considerable time, you have strengthened you right side of the brain and have become close to ambidextrous.

        Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 18, 2013 | Reply

  69. I get so confused looking at that image…it turns clock wise and the dances a bit and then changes to anti clock wise….I use right hand…. I draw….I don’t like reading….I like cartoons…I am 24 years old. I laugh a lot….I love people…but I want my space because I keep a lot of things…many things… Am I trully right handed…

    Comment by confidence | February 6, 2013 | Reply

    • Image is just a tool, not to completely rely on that. A lot of things constitute for one to be truly left handed or right handed

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 18, 2013 | Reply

  70. I was raised to use my right hand, but I always remembered my mom would hit me with chop sticks whenever I try to write or eat with my left hand. I’m 25 now and my hand writing holds record at school and work for being the ugliest hand writing ever. I can’t even read my own hand writing. Whenever I write with my right hand it feels like i have to focus extra hard to write out the letters instead of paying attention to what I was really studying. I use to love drawing but also gave up because I struct a wall, I struggle so much trying to draw what I was envisioning in college but then I accepted it as only a hobby and nothing is special if I can’t show what I see. I kept doubting myself, why I think this way and there’s something wrong with me. I gave up using chop sticks too, it’s just too hard using my right hand and embarrassing when other Asian cultures (that uses chop sticks) would ask me why do I use a spoon or fork instead of chop sticks for certain Asian dishes. My friends and family thinks I’m crazy, but today I finally got fed up with my hand writing and I Googled “Can you force a child to be right handed?” and you popped up! I’m not alone!

    Comment by L.T.H.B | February 16, 2013 | Reply

    • Reading your comment I definitely feel that I am not alone either. You have experienced practically the same as I have.

      Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | February 18, 2013 | Reply

    • you have same experience as me…i feel im not alone too…

      Comment by Rahul Narasimman | February 23, 2013 | Reply

  71. Funny thing, I’m a right dominate person but it was going counter clockwise. and about 7 seconds later it started going clockwise then it went back to counterclockwise when I barely did anything. Then it went back and forth when ever I wanted too. I thought this was an animated gif trying to trick me at first but really it’s an optic illusion, an illusion that moves and whatever side your dominant with will make it seem like it’s going that direction. a person who is right handed will probably not know how to concentrate on their opposing side, all people have trouble with this (people who have one dominate side). I use my right hand to draw and write but I use my left for everything else almost always. I just tried writing with my left hand after looking at this and they are pretty equally skilled. it’s funny because I’ve never even used my left hand before for writing/drawing, I never tried or thought about it till now. I’m an artist so this will be funny when I’m drawing with two hands at the exact same time “two HANDS are better then one”. it will also be cool for my drawings since my left could draw logically and my right could draw emotionally/feeling and etc. this is really cool I would have never discovered this if it wasn’t for you!
    thankyou

    Comment by gypsy | February 19, 2013 | Reply

  72. i was born left handed and still am. I am very thankful that I was not forced to change.
    However, I cannot use a calculator with my left hand– I have to use my right had on the calculator and this is the only thing i do right handed. why just the calculator??

    Comment by Pat Hoffpauir | February 26, 2013 | Reply

  73. I’m another of the many, many people who are victims of this crime. As a completely right brained person it makes it extremely hard for me to manage. I never forgave my parents and made sure they knew it too.

    Comment by ragheadthefiendlyterrorist | February 28, 2013 | Reply

    • One of the reasons why my mom had trained me to be right handed was because she had an superstition of left handed people. She came from a poor country and was poorly educated, so her decision wasn’t the most educated. I don’t resent her for her decision because she didn’t know better and I am starting over again at the age of 25. It has been 12 days since I have found out I was left handed and my life is changing every second. I still use my right hand but when it comes to doing my homework or writing notes at work, I’m using my left hand. At first my left hand had the present of a 5 year old but it’s dramatically improving as I write daily and so far i have drawn two pictures… and omg I AM LEFT HANDED. I want to keep updating you guys on this and please share more amazing stories of your struggles and improvements!

      My drawing from my right hand
      http://akarilee.deviantart.com/art/Human-Squirtle-294195607

      My first attempt with my left hand (2/24/2013)
      http://akarilee.deviantart.com/art/Left-hand-progress-1-356933189

      My second attempt with my left hand (2/27/2013)
      http://akarilee.deviantart.com/art/Left-hand-Progress-2-356933070

      Comment by L.T.H.B | March 1, 2013 | Reply

      • OMG Linda this is great. Please do keep us updated on your progress. This is incredible, and in 12 days only? Amazing

        Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | March 1, 2013 | Reply

  74. me too.I am a left hander.but my grandma(father mother) forced me to change to left hand.

    Comment by surya | March 17, 2013 | Reply

  75. sorry to righthand

    Comment by surya | March 17, 2013 | Reply

  76. Okay, I have read most of these post and so many facts online about changing a person who should be a lefty but is made to be use their right hand. I thought my son maybe left handed because sometimes he seemed to write with his left hand more when he was 3 and 4 so I just made him continue, my oldest son is a lefty and thought maybe it was in the Genes. It all makes since now, my son has the same learning problems but is the smartest child I have ever known when it comes to what comes out of his mouth or programming on the computer which is setup for a righty but in school he is a day dreamer. He comes home and doesn’t have to deal with this issue left or right, he does whatever and is okay until it is time for homework and it is a NIGHTMARE!!! Drifting off into space etc… We started to play sports, I started to always see him try and throw the ball with his right hand and I would always tell him to throw with his left, he still seems unable to do it like normal so I thought about it and had him try with his right, he does it normal, he swings the bat with his left and can’t get it right and the second he tried doing it right handed for the first time, he looked like he has always done it that way. His Gpa got him a 22 rife to go shooting at the range only when he visits in Vegas and he uses his right trigger finger to shot and his right eye to aim. On this moving cat test he said he watched the cat go counter clock-wise. Any thoughts if this could be part of his issue or all of it? Funny thing I found out after reading so much of this and even doing the test myself is I may of been a lefty but I am a righty. I write with my right hand, I am great at sports through out my childhood but I see it clock-wise, I automatically learned to play Pool left handed without thinking about it aim with my left eye the times I have gone shooting even though I shoot with my right trigger finger so my aim is bad but most of all I had the same learning disorder but yet I am the smartest person I have ever met. I just sucked at school and was also a day dreamer….

    Comment by Bob | March 19, 2013 | Reply

    • I am sure you’re a very intelligent person, because you show a lot of human awareness that a few people lack or don’t care for. Sometimes do you tell others or think to yourself “I feel like I have to think harder than most people?” when it comes to making simple decisions, communicating, or expressing yourself? I had those struggles and still do even after I started using my left hand again (started February 16,2013), even though I know the the answers in my head but I have such a difficult time expressing it in a timely matter compare to “normal” people with a faster response. It’s like a war within myself to make a desicion that could of been so simple to others.

      Comment by L.T.H.B | March 19, 2013 | Reply

  77. Hi again, I would like to point something out. I always uncounsciously chew on my left side first and only my left 2 wisdon teeth came out. Is it because I depended on my left a lot that the wisdom teeth was stimulated to grow first before the right ever did?

    Comment by L.T.H.B | March 19, 2013 | Reply

  78. you know i am a born right handed but from when i was born i just wanted to be a left handed. i dont know why but i just feel it deep in my heart. till today i am practicing and i just feel special and different in front of everyone when i do things with my left hand. is it a good thing or a bad thing to change hands?

    Comment by prerana | April 13, 2013 | Reply

  79. I was switched from left to right. I think the trick to the spinning girl is to blink rapidly and all of a sudden she’ll change directions. Maybe blinking “resets” the brain. Try it out, it works for me

    Comment by mike | April 17, 2013 | Reply

  80. I was a left handed and was force to change to right handed and I’ve always have the issue in writing and many times at a restuarnt eating stick, I too get confuse as to which hand i should hold the knife and which hand to hold the fork and I have to keep switching it. I find it so hard to drive on the right, I wish cars in my country are left instead of right. and as for the dancer, I can switch her from turning clock wise to anti clock wise as and when I want it and how fast I want it. ( half clock wise and half anti clock wise and on and on..am I weird or what?

    Comment by dakota | April 20, 2013 | Reply

  81. thank you very much for writing this, it has helped me greatly, i am 13 and my dad just told me that i was actually raised right handed but natrually left handed, and there were some uncanny similaritoes to my own life, so once again thank you

    Comment by kabir kumar | April 29, 2013 | Reply

  82. What if the image does not go in any direction and just stays still?

    Comment by kabir kumar | April 29, 2013 | Reply

  83. I was born left handed, I was left-handed when I went to primary school from year 1 and 2. However I still completely remember, my Dad forced me to write on my right hand. He said that they will not accept me in year 3 if I don’t write on my right hand. I am 42 yrs of age now and use my right hand since till now when writing but there are still things I do on m left hand like chores. I wonder what did I become if I kept using my left hand?

    Comment by Reena | May 2, 2013 | Reply

  84. Hello again, I just read about a disorder that had very similar effects we have from being forced to use our left hand. It’s called “Attention Deficient/Hyperactivity Disorder” by Quick Reference to the Diagnostic Criteria from DSM-IV-TR. This book is for case managers, therapist, and other professional to use to have quick diagnose of their patient.
    I had 17/18 of the symptoms when I was using my right hand for 25 years of my life. Now it’s 8/18 after I switched back to my left hand, and it’s improving more!
    Please share if you can relate to any of these symptoms.

    Attention Deficient/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Page 1 http://akarilee.deviantart.com/art/252595-10151416590462647-1602327392-N-371171046?q=in%3Ascraps%20sort%3Atime%20gallery%3Aakarilee&qo=1

    Page 2 http://akarilee.deviantart.com/art/182573-10151416590407647-1158742082-N-371171109?q=in%3Ascraps%20sort%3Atime%20gallery%3Aakarilee&qo=0

    Comment by L.T.H.B | May 12, 2013 | Reply

  85. I saw my mother teach my two younger brothers to be right handed. They both had difficulity learning to read. I have wondered if I should have been left handed also. Have any of you done this….I say turn right and point left or I say turn left and point right all the time. And even when I am simply driviing back the same way I came I will turn the wrong way every time unless I remember a landmark. I am now in my fifties and I also have attention dificiet disorder. When I first looked at the dancing girl she was going clock wise. But then when I look and then back she is turning clockwise then counter clockwise. Or when I look back she may be turning counter clockwise.

    Comment by Vonda | May 20, 2013 | Reply

    • I did that a lot too, before I had a hard time distinguishing my right and left. My previous post on May,12th, I stated that I had a severe case of ADHD, but it has lessened now after I switch back to my left. I’m 25 years old (Professionals that I have talked is still doubting my theory… but I’ll update you guys if I find more evidence on this) Thanks!

      Comment by L.T.H.B | May 20, 2013 | Reply

  86. I have something in mind,.. I have this 16 years old drum student. I was teaching her to play my way of playing the drums right handed way. For us drummers, we have this practice of developing our left hand if it’s our weakest hand. In her case, I didn’t bothered to ask if she’s a right handed person because I saw her playing right handed guitars the first time I saw her and I think that She can play it that way well so I really thought that she’s a right handed person. Later after 2 years I read in her notes that she’s a left handed person. I was shocked because I can’t see the difference before. It really feels that she’s a right handed person on drums. She didn’t even bothered to tell me then. I have friends though that are left handed and ended up playing right hand setup for drums. Their reasons, tired of setting up a right hand setup in a bar.

    Comment by Migs | May 26, 2013 | Reply

  87. I was born left-handed also, but my mom forced me to use my right hand. She thought it would be easier for me to be right handed. However, I still eat with my left hand, lead off with the left foot when walking, and other such things. The only thing I don’t do left handed is write.

    Comment by Lynn Thaler | June 6, 2013 | Reply

  88. I was born left handed but switched due to peer pressure when I entered preschool. I broke my right arm and wrist numerous times as a kid and it was only my natural left handedness that saved me in school! The best thing about that moving image of the dancer is that I only had to relax in order to change the direction of the movement. If it was clockwise I just took a deep breath and it changed! No focus required. It entertained me for a good 5 minutes.

    Comment by Rachel | June 15, 2013 | Reply

  89. I was raised in the 1970s. My grandmother convinced my father that there was no place in the world for left-handed people, so he forced me to become right-handed. To this day, I resent that. Of course, I write with my right hand. I perform other activities, like playing pool, bowling and driving with my left hand. Baseball is out of the question since I catch and throw with my left. I shoot a rifle right-handed. I often feel uncoordinated at times. I’m all screwed up.

    Comment by Shannon | June 25, 2013 | Reply

  90. There are a lot of victims posting on tis site. I don’t believe any of the suggestions that if you force someone to be right handed, then someone did you wrong. Some parents especially today allow their kids to grow like weeds in a garden without discipline or structure. I urged all my 4 children to be right handed and am very happy that I took the time.

    Comment by Marie | July 7, 2013 | Reply

    • Letting your kids’ development fall by the wayside and not taking the time to actively participate in their learning new skills would be the equivalent of letting them “grow like weeds”. Just because the majority of people are right-handed doesn’t mean that it is necessarily the “proper” handedness. I still have plenty of issues that I deal with on a daily basis that have their roots all the way back to my early grade school years.

      I wish I had better teachers who were more equipped and qualified to work with a special needs student like I used to be. But the times were different then and we’re constantly expanding our understanding of ourselves as time continues to march forward.

      If your kids never had any issues developmentally, then they were probably all born righty’s. I was very lucky that I had a understanding and patient mother who never forced me to learn with my right hand. I’d be a much different person today if she hadn’t.

      Comment by Dave | September 18, 2013 | Reply

  91. […] grazing through my normal routine today, I stumbled across a great blog post about handedness. Handedness dictates our preference in using the right or left side of our bodies. The majority of […]

    Pingback by Entrepreneur or Neuropreneur | ActiveAdjustment | July 8, 2013 | Reply

  92. you have written very nicely and it was very much relate with my life.i also switchover from right to left hand in very late but i managed it with a hard practice.

    Comment by robinhood | July 11, 2013 | Reply

  93. thank you for sharing this… I found out from my mother that when I was a child, I would pick up a pen or pencil and started scribbling with my left hand and each time, she would correct me and change my writing material to the right, eventually it was ingrained in me and I now do a lot of stuff with my right hand, though I have problems doing certain things with my right like I have to hold my fork in my right and spoon in my left or wearing my my belt upside down till i realised the logo was upside down.

    I wonder if the switch has really affected me, not that I want to blame the fact that I am a complete mess in my life, in career, as in what I want to do and be in life, but it just seems I want so much to create things, but I feel like my creativity is stuck and it is bursting inside of me but I feel completely numb, I can’t express freely even if i was asked to. Perhaps it is due to the switch and the greater use of the non-dominant side of the brain but I know as a child i spent countless of hours making up stories in my head, even with the dried blotches of paint formed at the bottom of the wall, I would come up with images and stories to go with it…. up until now, I tend to day dream a lot and find it hard to live in reality…

    I also wonder if the switch has an effect on me in that I spent all my life wishing I was left handed. Does anyone who is a true right handed or a converted right handed ever feel this way?

    I am so totally confused. I wished I was left a lefty perhaps I would thrive in a creative job and feel less of a misfit.

    Comment by ratzx31 | August 14, 2013 | Reply

  94. I’m seeing a flaw in the spinning dancer graphic. I see a visual clue that determines a counter-clockwise movement and I’d like to ask anyone else’s opinion. Look closely; there is a reflection that shows the extended foot which I believe biases the test and clues us that the foot is toward the back of the dancer if she is spinning counter-clockwise. It shows depth, right? Does anyone’s else see this? – Try covering the reflection at the bottom of the image and see if it is still as difficult for you to change her direction.

    Comment by Rob | August 22, 2013 | Reply

  95. It’s much easier for me to see it moving clockwise but if I try very hard then it is definatly possible for me to reverse it.

    Comment by Matthew | August 30, 2013 | Reply

  96. Very interesting indeed. I’m 66 years old and have always wondered how this would change a person. As a young boy, at Catholic School, I was forced to switch hands when learning writing skills. I’m sure now that I was a natural lefty. This was frowned upon during my school era. My parents were both college educated and gifted in athletics. This was years ago and the standard practice, at that time, was to make sure all kids learned to write with their right hand (no blame here). I excelled in all sports. Playing baseball I would bat left handed and throw with my right hand. During this period of time it was almost impossible to find a left handed baseball glove. Later I learned how to bat right handed too (or switch hit). In football I would kick with my left foot. Even today I’m still an active runner yet it’s my left leg that is the stronger by far. I use my right foot for the gas pedal and my left foot for the brake (bizarre). At about 10 years old I remember begging my grandmother to play catch with me (baseball). We only had two gloves at home mine and my fathers. Both gloves were to catch with the left hand thus throw with the right hand. My grandmother put the glove on her ‘right’ hand and threw with her left hand. In later years I figured I must have inherited my lefty side from grandmother.
    Many thanks for your shared information as I’ve wondered many times over my lifetime if forcing someone to change hands would have negative effects. I’m encouraged that we know so much more today and won’t repeat these unintentional mistakes.

    Comment by Zipper | September 4, 2013 | Reply

  97. When I was in first grade my teacher noticed I was using both hands and told me I needed to pick one hand I held the scissors in both and said I liked my left better she tried to make me use the right and kept saying now are you sure but I told her I was sure. I Alwalys chose my left over my right and when my left would get tired I switched. Now my left is used for everything besides I can throw with both hands. I Played soccer and I defanitly kick with my left but I can usr my right for little things like passing. My grandma is the only other left person I know and I have alwalys got along with her more and we got eachother easily. While most people find a hard time to understand me as I do them. I fit very well with all the things a right brained aka left handed person does and not to well with right brained at all but If I focus really well I can make,the figure turn the other way for the tinest bit of time.

    Comment by haley n williams | September 5, 2013 | Reply

  98. For me it started off going counter-clockwise, then I read that if you focus it’ll change, so I tried, and now I can see it changing on average of every 6 seconds. What does that mean? I remember that when I was little I used my left hand, but then all my friends kept commenting on it so I switched on my own (around second grade)

    Comment by anonymous | September 11, 2013 | Reply

  99. This is a very interesting article that you have put together. I’m in a similar boat – as a child, I started grade school at a Catholic school where it was greatly preferred that every student be right-handed. My mother was wonderful, though, because she never forced me to use one hand over the other. Instead, she would offer me the choice (ex. placing the spoon or fork in the center-front of the dish when I was learning how to use one). I had a really hard time up through the 2nd grade, when I was held back. I was writing sentences completely backwards to where you would actually have to hold the paper up to a mirror in order to read what I wrote down. My pencil grip required a great deal of force, so my hand would tire out really quickly. I was also very sensitive as a kid, so being singled out in front of my classes was not the best way to address my issues.

    Although we have lots in common, I had a few differences growing up. The first one being that my handwriting is really good and has been since I became more proficient at writing in early grade school. It impaired me at first, because I was really slow and a huge perfectionist. I learned how to relax a bit more once I got to high school, so now it isn’t much of a problem.

    I was well above average in terms of sketching and cartooning. I also noticed that I perceived things a lot differently than most others did. I could see certain details that nobody else was able to pick up.

    I have an above average IQ and math and science based problems have always come very easily to me. Granted, there are hard problems that still take time to figure out. But, so long as I have the tools to solve something (whether it be self-taught or learned only once) I’m usually able to figure out most difficult problems with a little time and patience.

    I play piano (self taught) and can play more complex pieces (Fur Elise, Moonlight Sonata – not very difficult, but harder than Chopsticks) entirely by ear. I still to this day cannot read sheet music, but I’m pretty good at music theory and songwriting.

    Growing up, I always knew that I was different from everybody else. The biggest difference being that I was always driven by my imagination and emotions. Yet, once I learned how to hone my skills a little more, I was really good at science and math while still earning higher marks for writing and literature. At 25 years old, I’m still trying to figure out what I want to do “when I grow up”. I’m good at a lot of things, but I’ve never been truly great at anything. That’s been my biggest challenge so far as I try to find my place in this world.

    Good luck to anybody else who had this problem or similar circumstances as a kid.

    Comment by Dave | September 18, 2013 | Reply

  100. I’m left handed and have heard all the stuff above at what lefties are supposedly good at. Maybe it missed me. I don’t seem to excel at that list, but rather seem to do okay (not super, just good enough) at a lot of what was written about both lefties and righties. And what I do consider myself good at is in the wrong damn category.

    As for the dancer figure, I can make that thing change direction with ease. Because of that, I’m not sure which direction is my natural way of seeing it. If you’re having trouble making the direction turn at will, you could try the following.

    a.) Slowly close your eyes while looking at it and then while either squinting or with eyes completely closed, envision the dancer twirling the direction you want it to. Open your eyes and you might just find her spinning in the desired direction. You can even try it while concentrating when staring off-screen. It’s worth trying a couple times if you can’t get it.

    OR

    b.) Scroll down so that just the bottom portion of the animation is showing. By “bottom portion” I mean JUST the shadow. NO part of the black figure (e.g. the foot) should be showing. Then try making that portion spin in the desired direction while looking at it. If you can do that, simply scroll up and the dancer will be spinning the direction you wanted. If you can’t do that, it might be because the shadow of the extended foot and that of the centered one seem to be turning in opposite directions to your brain. If so, then with the page still only showing the shadow, use your finger (horizontally) to block out the moving shadow of the extended foot. With just the shadow of the centered foot, it may be easier to change direction now. If you got it, just scroll up. If it still gives you problems, then I’d say incorporate a bit of plan ‘a’ into this method.

    Comment by randomdudeontheinterwebs | September 21, 2013 | Reply

  101. Question: but what dirction is she REALLY going? I saw her going back and forth.

    Comment by alberto | September 28, 2013 | Reply

  102. When I started first grade (I was born in 1958) my teacher told my mom that she couldn’t teach how to write correctly if I was left handed. So…. when I was 6 I became right handed, sort of. Now, my husband is constantly complaining that I put things in the cabinet backwards. For example, I rip the foil with my left hand and the box goes back in facing the left. When he uses the foil, the box is put in to the right. There are a lot of little things that you never lose. My writing slants to the left unless i turn the paper sideways to the left. Back in the day, some people didn’t think it was good to be left handed.

    Comment by Tammy | October 24, 2013 | Reply

  103. For the figure above, I can now see her move in both directions

    Comment by Tammy | October 24, 2013 | Reply

  104. HERE IS THE SECRET: to Making her change Directions..the first time i looked at her she was spinning counterclockwise for two seconds then suddenly i looked away and then back and she was spinning clockwise..after that i couldnt get her to change..about 15 minutes later she changed..back to counter clockwise, then i realized that I could’nt get her to change directions when i stared straight at her…BUT then i realized that all i had to do to change her direction was look to the Bottom LEFT Corner…or to the Bottom RIGHT Corner..

    BTW My mom Forced me to be a Righty as a Child..

    Comment by Ant | October 27, 2013 | Reply

    • (With my eyes Only..NOT turning my head)i look all the way to the my Right .then back at the image .or look to the left and then back at the image

      Comment by Ant | October 27, 2013 | Reply

  105. I’ve read your article and I can reallly really relate to what you’ve been through. My grandmother told my mom to teach me using my right handed. Only when I was old enough to realize that it had affected my life and ability to think. I became very very restricted in my actions I have several thoughts in my mind that I can comprehend only in my mind. But once I blurt it out, Im always short of words. It’s like I always have to choose which words are appropriate to tell and it often kills me not to tell what I really wanted to say. I end up being silent because it’s the easiest thing to do. My college classmates used to laugh at me when I’m spaced out and my mom still scolds me for not attentively listening to her. Sometimes it hurts me because I knew all along that I always listen to her but she still picks on me even on the smallest things. She used to teach me math when i was little. I told her I hate it and I remember her always scolding at me when I don’t get it several times. Eventually I learned to simply study on my own because im sick of her always shouting at me. I did learn and I considered that I “love” from then on. But eventually I realized i still hate it. Somehow I appreciated Science because it’s about discovering the unknown. But what was taught in this subject is already known and I realized all I really did in school is memorize and eventually it bored me. But I still have the enthusiasm about it if it’s not put into an exam. I told you that it hurts me hearing my mom saying that i am not listening to her. It’s because all my life I have made her walk up to the stage to receive medals because I always topped the class . Looking back I realized why Im not very excited about receiving those medals because i didn’t know how will i use it. (and now ive vented it out.) like you, i gave up expressing my imagination. I used to draw things but it’s always unfinished and no matter how much i practice it, my imagination doesn’t come out of me naturally. Logic and analyzation also tires me out especially now that im taking up accountancy in college. I realize now that this was a careless decision i made. I think i can cope up with it but only if i shut myself out with others because this course and needs a lot of time to think. The only time i relax my self is when i sleep and imagine stories. I’ve had a lot of them in my mind but i think ive wasted most of it because i’ve had not written any of it. And it also meant sacrificing my sleeping hours. Words don’t come out of me naturally except if it’s about my feelings and when i wrote them. I felt and this is the only time i’ve told someone about this. Now im confused as to which i truly wanted to do. I want to create things but my the expectations from me holds me back. This makes me feels sad in the inside but i always look neutral on the outside so no one knows. I don’t wven know if someone will listen. Sorry for the long read but thanks for letting me know im not the only one.

    Comment by Patricia J | November 1, 2013 | Reply

    • me to i had similar experience….

      Comment by Rahul Narasimman | November 11, 2013 | Reply

  106. I was made to switch to my right hand in 2nd grade when the teacher noticed I was making 3’s and d’s backwards. She called my parents in and told them what she thought and they went along with it. This article is very helpful to me. I don’t feel so odd when I listen to all of you. I remember in elementary school that the teacher would have us do math problems out loud and in order. I would quickly count ahead and see which problem would be mine and then do it on my fingers. If a kid before me missed their answer I went into a panic trying to do another problem so I wouldn’t be thought of as dumb.
    I’ve always wondered if this forced switch had something to do with decision making. I’m not decisive and often defer to others to decide on movies, restaurants, etc.
    I can really relate to the daydreaming comments. I was always chastised by teachers for looking out the window during class. I still have that behavior today but the weird thing is that if I take a multiple choice test I always pass. I daydreamed all the way through my master’s program and couldn’t stand to read the boring books but graduated with a 3.8.
    I still daydream a lot of the time and I’m really glad that they came up with the DVR. If I space out during a program I like I can just hit the back arrow and see what I missed.
    Some of the daydreaming can be harmful though. I can get lost in fantasies which can be fear or anger based. It takes a while to shake those out of my head. I’m a psychotherapist now and I tell patients that entertaining negative thought like revenge fantasies can be harmful. Your emotions can’t distinguish between what’s just a thought and what’s reality. They react the same and can lead to anxiety and anger and, I believe, impact your immune system negatively.
    Will welcome any feedback.
    Ken

    Comment by Ken Schaeffer | November 9, 2013 | Reply

  107. I unfortunately made a decision to have my son write with his right a few years ago (he is now 8) and want to know if I can or should help him try to develop his left hand writing. If so, how do I begin doing this without disrupting his 3rd grade progress?

    Comment by Ariel | November 13, 2013 | Reply

  108. i am an identical twin I found out a few years ago that i was born left handed. I discovered this when talking to my friends who are twins one of them is a lefty and the other right handed. They explained that this is true of all identical twins. I spoke to my mother and she confirmed that i was left handed but she thought if it was best if my right hand was dominant and so forced me to switch. I don’t remember this at all and always believed i was born right handed. I always felt compared to my twin that i was less intelligent i remember getting told off in class for not colouring within the lines but I loved maths (i did it for A level) and i am a working opera singer. I think what i am trying to say is being forced to be right handed does not mean you are limited to reaching your potential just maybe you have to work a bit harder in some areas. The figure only turns clockwise for me i cannot make it change!

    Comment by Grace | January 10, 2014 | Reply

  109. This blog is interesting, and quite accurate. I was born left-handed but my mother made me be right-handed due to the increase in left handed supplies at the time(apparently) and so all my life I had difficulties writing. However, I still had a preference to use my left-hand in new things for some reason, and so when I finally learned to ride a bike, I could turn left easier than right(both with hands and without) and could easily use my left-hand to steer and not my right at all. When playing sports, I had a tendency to use my left-hand(except baseball I think) but ended up able to use both hands anyways. When it comes to thinking tho, I use logic and I am an amazing but complicated form of thinking and solving and I actually am able to give excellent answers even tho, I do not really have preferences or opinions, and I am if not equal, slightly better in writing than math but worse in understanding of reading than science(main subject) I am amazing at languages tho and easily learn them with at least some effort and availability. When drawing however, I always put symbolism in my drawings but can not easily come up of things to draw and use my emotions and experiences to create something(I often drew doves in school times). Therefore, I suppose I am somewhat ambidextrous maybe leaning more lefthanded, however am an even more mixed version of it, it seems. Thoughts perhaps?

    Comment by Brandon | January 30, 2014 | Reply

  110. I’m right-handed (which means left brain dominant) but the girl in the image turns only clockwise to me! Why??

    Comment by -cL | February 16, 2014 | Reply

    • Maybe because your mom/dad changed what hand you used from a young age? Ask your parents, you may learn a dark truth. Lol

      Comment by Anna | March 3, 2014 | Reply

  111. Woah. My mind is blown. I think I need to ask my mom if she changed my “handed-ness”. I know my mom is old school and condemns being left handed, but I for some reason never considered she may have forced me to use right from before what my memory serves. Looking at that lady I CANNOT see her move counter clockwise. Also, my left side I have ALWAYS felt to be dominant. My left eye certainly is. Thank you so much for this!!! Now, to ask my mom the hard truth.

    Comment by Anna | March 3, 2014 | Reply

    • Also I am left handed in baseball and hockey and I always remember that when I skated I had to glide/balance on my left foot as my right felt more wobbly. Oh! And I got my motorcycle lisence two years ago and could easily make left hand turns but felt very shaky and unsure leaning to the right. I am going to be so upset if I find out my mom changed me.

      BY THE WAY, I found this blog because I think my baby is left handed and I wanted to know more about it. After reading left handedness may be genetic and then reading an article that described me, it dawned on me that I AM A LEFTY!!!! WOAH

      Comment by Anna | March 3, 2014 | Reply

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    Comment by Total Wellness Cleanse Review | March 4, 2014 | Reply

  113. This is my blog! Thank you for changing my life and I’m sorry! I mentioned your blog title incorrectly! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCsZ3mipE90&list=UUzQ1_-i9K0bQ_HMcNAtVOGQ

    Comment by L.T.H.B | March 19, 2014 | Reply

  114. I had to stare at the shadow to see a reversal in spinning direction

    Comment by Yitao Li | March 24, 2014 | Reply

  115. Hello
    I was also forced to go from left -handed to right handed. I also face the same problems mentioned. I have great difficulty while making a decision now because I feel that both parts of my brain are equally dominant. But I am pretty good at analysing the situation. I usually have an inner conflict because of which I end up being conscious of what I am doing and how it will affect me in the long run and end up doing worse than what I could actually do. I have a great skill for analysis but conclusions drawn by me are often confusing even to myself. Over the last 16 years of my life, my left hemisphere grew as dominant as right hemisphere and now even my analysis is way to confusing. Often I can’t follow up on my own thoughts and though I have a high IQ. I can’t solve some problems because of the multitude of thoughts striking me at the same time. I used to read a lot of novels and loved literature and had quite a lot of fantasies but now I am more science oriented and logical. In fact I feel that being science oriented is boring. I am emotionally unstable as well since I draw a general opinion about something that I should not as a logical person (the big picture) but that is something I don’t want to do. I have speech problems that I did not have earlier. I speak too fast missing some words or connecting them which others have problem understanding although when i repeat them to myself, they make perfect sense. I like being logical and have chosen a science based career but I was born left handed. Even now I am so very confused to write down my views that I have to reconsider while writing every sentence, I have faced a lot of depression because of this. Should I switch my hand? I can easily do that. That is not much of a challenge as compared to what I am going through as an engineering student. Will going back to being a left handed writer benefit me or not? Will it help curb the confusion problem or retain my emotional stability? Even though I play with my left. I am bad at aiming the ball at the right place. I often aim a few degrees to the right of what I actually should to get the aim right. What should I do to correct that?

    Comment by Aditya Chawla | March 28, 2014 | Reply

    • Hello! I definitely recommend switching back. I had the exact same war within myself a year ago before I saw this blog. Thr simplest decision like turning right or left was straining and when I talk to customers I get so emotionally overwhelm because my mind is going 100 mph but my body or mouth just can’t express it accordingly. I felt dumb and slow, but I tried really hard just to do something so simple. I am free now, and I am doing what I love and that is working with children and actually getting A’s in my class! There will be some relapses at times, but of course it takes time to heal. Theres a book called hidden handedness by Samuel Randolph. I hope you get a chance to read it.

      Comment by lthbui | March 28, 2014 | Reply

  116. Hello
    Can u give me more tasks to identify which of my brain is dominant pleas ,cuz the result is like im right brain dominant, while im right handed…

    Comment by Kurdstan Osman Kurda | April 16, 2014 | Reply

  117. Stumbling on this article after observing my 2 year old niece. It might be a bit soon, but I am thinking she’s either left handed or ambidextrous. She seemed to prefer her left when coloring and scribbling but would also switch hands. With me I believe I am ambidextrous, or perhaps a lefty, though learned to use my right hand for writing. I’m believing more ambidextrous.

    Growing up I believed to be right handed, but in high school art is when I started to really question it. In projects using power tools or using a jeweler’s saw, I found myself switching hands with ease, being equally skilled sawing and dremeling with both hands. My favorite subject in school was art with science being a close second. Math was my least. I could do it okay, I was told by one math teacher I did well and he was surprised when I told him I hated the subject. I was painfully slow. It took me more time to complete math than other stuff. But as an adult I sometimes like doing stuff with numbers. I like the general concept. And science I like logic, but I also see myself as strongly right brain dominant. That and all the flaws associated. But yeah no matter what I do, people tell me I am creative. Both art and science were my strongest subjects and perhaps writing too. I could pull off creative writing with ease. Wait until right before the class and pull off an A writing some creative essay.

    Now an adult I come back thinking about my kindergarten experience. I didn’t know what tool to use. I kept switching between the lefty grip and righty grip, and left handed/ right handed scissors. At some point I believe the teachers made me choose a hand, or I gravitated to the right because there were more of those tools than the left handed ones. I might have also chosen because the English language favors right hand writing.

    But yeah I’m sure I’m left eye dominant, left foot dominant (though could switch over to kick right occasionally). Throw with either hand, but might prefer my left? Idk. I do most activities with my left. Or equally with both hands. Eating: right hand but if I make a hand switch I do just about as well. I went to my grandma and in conversation she revealed to me she couldn’t tell what hand I was dominant with. She caught me holding stuff in both hands. Both hands always filled. So yeah I believe I am true ambidextrous or at least mixed dominance, with writing preference/ strength in right hand, but equally skilled in other things with either hand. And that figure – clockwise most of the time, but I can see it switching. And if I try to force it to change it doesn’t work. It just switches on its own time. I guess that might mean my brain chooses dominance for the moment?

    And the not coming to conclusions problem. And the brain at WAR. So true with me. When presented with a question I’ll consider the logistics, then consider the ethics, what is right/wrong, then consider my emotions about each scenario. Then go back to logistics, then back and forth… Often there is no right or wrong. Just opinion or preference. And what is my opinion? What do I base it off of? Logic or emotion? What if those two are opposite? All the while it could be something like just choosing a menu item. What item do I want to eat right now? I have to say no to the other possibilities. Oh and debates, often I can see both sides of arguments. In a way I am learning to listen to my emotions and make decisions on that, rather than going by logic alone. This being true in situations where I need to be assertive. What is logically best might not be best for my emotions and vise versa. It makes a real serious conflict.

    Now with this article I am left wondering had things been different, if I had stuck with the left hand to write what would have been different? In my 30’s with carpel tunnel in my right I just might find myself seeing what happens when I use my left hand more. Already on the downside I notice I struggle with spelling when I use my left more, increased stuttering, and perhaps some language confusion when typing/writing and organizing but on the advantage seems to help my creativity. To fully improve I’ll need to find links to do left hand writing. My left hand writing is legible and almost as good as my right but awkward. I find some jumps and uncoordinated turns. I am trying to do the same motions with the left as the right. So yeah it will take some learning, but it will be interesting to see if writing with my left helps more than hurts.

    Comment by MI | April 23, 2014 | Reply

    • I was born left handed but at the age of three I was forced by a religious order of Nuns to use my right hand to write . A wooden rule forcefully applied to the back of my left hand when I tentatively reached for a pencil to write forced me to accept the fact that as the “Holy Nun” told me forcefully, using my left hand was using the Devil’s instrument . I am now 77yrs old, am a non believer in any religion and believe that most religions are arrogant, presumptive and extremely dangerous. If your child is born live accept that life , love and encourage it and do not be guided by ridiculous, nonsensical religious rubbish.

      Comment by Patrick Kenehan | April 27, 2014 | Reply

  118. Hey everyone! I just started a FaceBook group for people who were innately left-handed, but were forced or were pressured to switched to their right hand. It would be great to mobilize for support and education! Please join/like if you are one of us: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Converted-Left-Handers/624819867593215 (or search for: Converted Left Handers).

    Comment by Converted Lefty | April 30, 2014 | Reply

  119. This helped me understand myself. Ive stuttered for as long as I can remember and Ive assumed it was because I was forced to write right handed since I heard the people mention it in the movie The King’s Speech. Ive always had bad handwriting and Im almost in college now. I love playing music, drawing, making things, foreign language, math, science, emotion, fantasy, and I scored “genius” on an IQ test given by a professional. If thats not proof enough of my split-preference, the spinning lady keeps changing directions on me. Im left dominant when throwing and other strength-related activities, but I still write right handed and Im mostly right footed. Im ambidextrous in some things like batting in baseball and using a computer mouse. I shoot guns right handed, but shoot bows left handed. I use scissors right handed, but undo bottle caps with my left hand. I dont know about my eyes though… Anyways, Im thankful I had the chance to read this article. And thank you for caring enough this far if anyone does.

    Comment by Daniel | May 10, 2014 | Reply

  120. It’s an amazing article. Thanks. I have a question: it’s possible for any reason to the eye-dominant change?

    Comment by BOB | May 12, 2014 | Reply

    • I’m asking this because while all this did happend with me: very poor writing(no matter how hard I try), lack of attention, love maths and my mother told me I was using left-hand until I went to school. I used to do things like a leftie too like holding with left-hand, reading backwards and also there’s a lot of lefties in my family. I did a the test to find my dominant-eye using this method (http://www.wikihow.com/Determine-Your-Dominant-Eye) method #1 and it give me the right-eye-dominant as result. I’m very confusing now…

      Comment by BOB | May 12, 2014 | Reply

      • Interesting. I have never thought from that perspective but from my limited understanding, I doubt eye-dominance could change UNLESS you are ambidextrous. Ambidextrous have equally powerful eyes due to equal dominance of the two halves of the brain. I guess if you keep on using one side of the brain a lot, you may eventually become dominant from one side.
        Also, the test given on wikihow link is slightly complicated. The simple method is

        1) Make a triangle with the thumbs and forefingers of your hands
        2) Place a distant object in the center of that triangle and look at it
        3) Slowly bring the triangle closer to your face till your hands hit your face
        4) Your hands will automatically bring the triangle towards your dominant eye

        Another way is the snooker way I have described in the article. I found the snooker method more accurate because I actually experienced the difference, with the finger pointing in completely different direction with right eye and exactly where I am pointing when checked from left eye.

        Comment by Wasio Ali Khan Abbasi | May 12, 2014 | Reply

  121. My life finally makes so much sense! I was born ambidextrous. Till senior kindergarten I switched between hands when writing and coloring. Once my mom noticed that I do the same with eating food. She started training me to use my right hand only. Then later on my dad and tutors subtly encouraged writing from my right hand. My writing is horrible to the point that even i don’t understand what I wrote LOL. Maybe if it were left to me, I would have picked my left hand. I write better than most non-left handers when I use my left hand.

    I always wanted to study history and either work in a museum or become an archeologist. I wanted to study English literature for the heck of it. But my mom was convinced I am a “genius” and I am wasting my potential. In highschool my Humanities grades were in 90s and my Science/Math grades were in 70s. I went to university to study science, and finally gave up in first year. I went to accounting next. Graduated with a commerce degree, passed my first chartered accountancy exam, worked as an accounting consultant… Yet was miserable.

    Finally had the guts to go back to school. This time to do a specialist in sociology and minor in professional writing. Your blog was very informational and eye opening! I am wondering if I can train my hands to go back to being left handed.

    Comment by Hina N. | May 19, 2014 | Reply

  122. I’m 19 years old and I am left handed. I was never forced to switch hands and have always used my left. I have a love for both history and math. Personally I believe that I have a couple of traits from both sides of the chart. I never did anything right handed until I joined martial arts, some instructors would make me train in a right handed stance. At first it felt very awkward and unnatural but after a year it started to feel slightly more easy. It was also the same situation when I began to shoot rifles because nobody I know owns a left/ambidextrous rifle. If i see the dancer spinning both ways does that mean I’m somewhat ambidextrous? and if that’s the case could I improve the ability to use both sides and see a noticeable difference?

    Comment by Jesse | June 1, 2014 | Reply

  123. Be proud of being left handed especially if you do best in maths like me.

    Comment by Mothadi shadrack | June 7, 2014 | Reply

  124. You’ve made some really good points there. I looked on the web for additional information about
    the issue and found most individuals will go along
    with your views on this site.

    Comment by milf | July 1, 2014 | Reply

  125. I have a question: what’s the side of your smile corner of mouth?

    Comment by Teka | July 3, 2014 | Reply


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